Surgical site infection in thoracic and lumbar fractures: incidence and risk factors in 11,401 patients from a nationwide administrative database

Erin A. Yamamoto, David J. Mazur-Hart, Jung Yoo, Josiah N. Orina

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

BACKGROUND CONTEXT: The rate of surgical site infection (SSI) following elective spine surgery ranges from 0.5%‒10%. Published reports suggest a higher SSI rate in non-elective spine surgery such as spine trauma; however, there is a paucity of large database studies examining this issue. PURPOSE: The objective of this study was to investigate the incidence and risk factors of SSI in patients undergoing spine surgery for thoracic and lumbar fractures in a large population database. STUDY DESIGN/SETTING: This is a retrospective study utilizing the PearlDiver Patient Claims Database. PATIENT SAMPLE: Patients undergoing spine surgery for thoracic and lumbar fractures between 2015-2020 were identified in the PearlDiver Patient Claims Database using ICD-10 codes. Patients were excluded who had another surgery either 14 days before or 21 days after the index spine surgery, or pathologic fracture. OUTCOME MEASURES: Rate of surgical site infection. METHODS: Clinical data collected from the PearlDiver database based on ICD-10 codes included gender, age, diabetes, smoking status, obesity, Elixhauser Comorbidity Index (ECI), Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI), and SSI. Univariate analysis was used to assess the association of potential risk factors and SSI. Multivariable analysis was used to identify independent risk factors of SSI. The authors have no conflicts of interest or funding sources to declare. RESULTS: A total of 11,401 patients undergoing spine surgery for thoracic and lumbar fractures met inclusion criteria, and 1,065 patients were excluded. 860 patients developed SSI (7.5%). Risk factors significantly associated with SSI in univariate analysis included diabetes (OR 1.50; 95% CI, 1.30‒1.73; p<.001), obesity (OR 1.66; 95% CI, 1.44‒1.92; p<.001), increased age (p<.001), ECI (p<.001), and CCI (p<.001). On multivariable analysis, obesity and ECI were independently associated with SSI (p<.001 and p<.001, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Non-elective surgery for thoracic and lumbar fractures is associated with a 7.5% risk of SSI. Obesity and ECI are independent predictors of SSI in this population. Limitations include the reliance on accurate insurance coding which may not fully capture all SSI, and in particular superficial SSI. These findings provide a broad overview of the risk of SSI in this population at a national level and may also help counsel patients regarding risk.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)281-286
Number of pages6
JournalSpine Journal
Volume23
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2023

Keywords

  • Charlson comorbidity index
  • Elixhauser comorbidity index
  • Lumbar fracture
  • Obesity
  • Surgical site infection
  • Thoracic fracture

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Clinical Neurology

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