Surgical outcome and improvement in quality of life after microvascular decompression for hemifacial spasms: A case series assessment using a validated disease-specific scale

Dibyendu K. Ray, Diaa Bahgat, Shirley McCartney, Kim Burchiel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Hemifacial spasm (HFS) is a movement disorder characterized by intermittent, involuntary clonic or tonic-clonic contractions of muscles innervated by the ipsilateral facial nerve. Recent studies have documented change in quality of life after HFS management with botulinum toxin injection. However, we failed to locate any study that documented change in quality of life after surgical management with retrosigmoid microvascular decompression (MVD). Methods: Our study objectives were 3-fold. Firstly, to use a disease-specific, validated quality of life assessment scale to document any change in quality of life after MVD for HFS. Secondly, to determine the time period in which the majority of patients undergoing MVD could be expected to benefit from surgery. Finally, to determine factors affecting the postoperative quality of life following MVD. A retrospective analysis of HFS patients treated with MVD at a single institution by a single surgeon (K.J.B.) between January 2000 and December 2007 was undertaken. A modification of a previously developed validated disease-specific quality of life assessment scale that included the addition of a parameter for difficulty in sleep was used to assess quality of life before and after surgery. Results: A total of 21 patients (14 female and 7 male) underwent treatment as specified. Eighty-five percent (17/20) of the patients reported prolonged remission of symptoms (mean follow-up period = 4.15 years). Five percent (1/20) reported occasional recurrence of twitches. The overall mean quality of life score improved from 11.1 preoperatively to 2.2 postoperatively. Conclusions: MVD offers significant and prolonged improvement in quality of life for the HFS patients we studied, as measured using a disease-specific, validated quality of life assessment scale. Postoperative quality of life, however, was strongly influenced by both the success of surgery in resolving the symptoms and the absence of any permanent complications of surgery.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)383-389
Number of pages7
JournalStereotactic and Functional Neurosurgery
Volume88
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2010

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Microvascular Decompression Surgery
Hemifacial Spasm
Quality of Life
Botulinum Toxins
Facial Nerve
Movement Disorders
Muscle Contraction
Sleep

Keywords

  • Hemifacial spasm
  • Microvascular decompression
  • Quality of life

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Surgery

Cite this

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title = "Surgical outcome and improvement in quality of life after microvascular decompression for hemifacial spasms: A case series assessment using a validated disease-specific scale",
abstract = "Background: Hemifacial spasm (HFS) is a movement disorder characterized by intermittent, involuntary clonic or tonic-clonic contractions of muscles innervated by the ipsilateral facial nerve. Recent studies have documented change in quality of life after HFS management with botulinum toxin injection. However, we failed to locate any study that documented change in quality of life after surgical management with retrosigmoid microvascular decompression (MVD). Methods: Our study objectives were 3-fold. Firstly, to use a disease-specific, validated quality of life assessment scale to document any change in quality of life after MVD for HFS. Secondly, to determine the time period in which the majority of patients undergoing MVD could be expected to benefit from surgery. Finally, to determine factors affecting the postoperative quality of life following MVD. A retrospective analysis of HFS patients treated with MVD at a single institution by a single surgeon (K.J.B.) between January 2000 and December 2007 was undertaken. A modification of a previously developed validated disease-specific quality of life assessment scale that included the addition of a parameter for difficulty in sleep was used to assess quality of life before and after surgery. Results: A total of 21 patients (14 female and 7 male) underwent treatment as specified. Eighty-five percent (17/20) of the patients reported prolonged remission of symptoms (mean follow-up period = 4.15 years). Five percent (1/20) reported occasional recurrence of twitches. The overall mean quality of life score improved from 11.1 preoperatively to 2.2 postoperatively. Conclusions: MVD offers significant and prolonged improvement in quality of life for the HFS patients we studied, as measured using a disease-specific, validated quality of life assessment scale. Postoperative quality of life, however, was strongly influenced by both the success of surgery in resolving the symptoms and the absence of any permanent complications of surgery.",
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T1 - Surgical outcome and improvement in quality of life after microvascular decompression for hemifacial spasms

T2 - A case series assessment using a validated disease-specific scale

AU - Ray, Dibyendu K.

AU - Bahgat, Diaa

AU - McCartney, Shirley

AU - Burchiel, Kim

PY - 2010/11

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N2 - Background: Hemifacial spasm (HFS) is a movement disorder characterized by intermittent, involuntary clonic or tonic-clonic contractions of muscles innervated by the ipsilateral facial nerve. Recent studies have documented change in quality of life after HFS management with botulinum toxin injection. However, we failed to locate any study that documented change in quality of life after surgical management with retrosigmoid microvascular decompression (MVD). Methods: Our study objectives were 3-fold. Firstly, to use a disease-specific, validated quality of life assessment scale to document any change in quality of life after MVD for HFS. Secondly, to determine the time period in which the majority of patients undergoing MVD could be expected to benefit from surgery. Finally, to determine factors affecting the postoperative quality of life following MVD. A retrospective analysis of HFS patients treated with MVD at a single institution by a single surgeon (K.J.B.) between January 2000 and December 2007 was undertaken. A modification of a previously developed validated disease-specific quality of life assessment scale that included the addition of a parameter for difficulty in sleep was used to assess quality of life before and after surgery. Results: A total of 21 patients (14 female and 7 male) underwent treatment as specified. Eighty-five percent (17/20) of the patients reported prolonged remission of symptoms (mean follow-up period = 4.15 years). Five percent (1/20) reported occasional recurrence of twitches. The overall mean quality of life score improved from 11.1 preoperatively to 2.2 postoperatively. Conclusions: MVD offers significant and prolonged improvement in quality of life for the HFS patients we studied, as measured using a disease-specific, validated quality of life assessment scale. Postoperative quality of life, however, was strongly influenced by both the success of surgery in resolving the symptoms and the absence of any permanent complications of surgery.

AB - Background: Hemifacial spasm (HFS) is a movement disorder characterized by intermittent, involuntary clonic or tonic-clonic contractions of muscles innervated by the ipsilateral facial nerve. Recent studies have documented change in quality of life after HFS management with botulinum toxin injection. However, we failed to locate any study that documented change in quality of life after surgical management with retrosigmoid microvascular decompression (MVD). Methods: Our study objectives were 3-fold. Firstly, to use a disease-specific, validated quality of life assessment scale to document any change in quality of life after MVD for HFS. Secondly, to determine the time period in which the majority of patients undergoing MVD could be expected to benefit from surgery. Finally, to determine factors affecting the postoperative quality of life following MVD. A retrospective analysis of HFS patients treated with MVD at a single institution by a single surgeon (K.J.B.) between January 2000 and December 2007 was undertaken. A modification of a previously developed validated disease-specific quality of life assessment scale that included the addition of a parameter for difficulty in sleep was used to assess quality of life before and after surgery. Results: A total of 21 patients (14 female and 7 male) underwent treatment as specified. Eighty-five percent (17/20) of the patients reported prolonged remission of symptoms (mean follow-up period = 4.15 years). Five percent (1/20) reported occasional recurrence of twitches. The overall mean quality of life score improved from 11.1 preoperatively to 2.2 postoperatively. Conclusions: MVD offers significant and prolonged improvement in quality of life for the HFS patients we studied, as measured using a disease-specific, validated quality of life assessment scale. Postoperative quality of life, however, was strongly influenced by both the success of surgery in resolving the symptoms and the absence of any permanent complications of surgery.

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KW - Microvascular decompression

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