Surgical options in the management of groin hernias

Tim Bax, Brett Sheppard, Richard A. Crass

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Inguinal and femoral hernias are the most common conditions for which primary care physicians refer patients for surgical management. Hernias usually present as swelling accompanied by pain or a dragging sensation in the groin. Most hernias can be diagnosed based on the history and clinical examination, but ultrasonography may be useful in differentiating a hernia from other causes of groin swelling. Surgical repair is usually advised because of the danger of incarceration and strangulation, particularly with femoral hernias. Three major types of open repair are currently used, and laparoscopic techniques are also employed. The choice of technique depends on several factors, including the type of hernia, anesthetic considerations, cost, period of postoperative disability and the surgeon's expertise. Following initial herniorrhaphy, complication and recurrence rates are generally low. Laparoscopic techniques make it possible for patients to: return to normal activities more quickly, but they are more costly than open procedures. In addition, they require general anesthesia, and the long-term hernia recurrence rate with these procedures is unknown.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)893-906
Number of pages14
JournalAmerican Family Physician
Volume59
Issue number4
StatePublished - Feb 15 1999

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Groin
Hernia
Femoral Hernia
Recurrence
Inguinal Hernia
Herniorrhaphy
Primary Care Physicians
Postoperative Period
General Anesthesia
Anesthetics
Ultrasonography
History
Costs and Cost Analysis
Pain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Surgical options in the management of groin hernias. / Bax, Tim; Sheppard, Brett; Crass, Richard A.

In: American Family Physician, Vol. 59, No. 4, 15.02.1999, p. 893-906.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bax, Tim ; Sheppard, Brett ; Crass, Richard A. / Surgical options in the management of groin hernias. In: American Family Physician. 1999 ; Vol. 59, No. 4. pp. 893-906.
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