Surgical management of vesicoureteral reflux in children

Jennifer Sung, Steven Skoog

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

46 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) is the most common uropathy affecting children. Compared to children without VUR, those with VUR have a higher rate of pyelonephritis and renal scarring following urinary tract infection (UTI). Options for treatment include observation with or without antibiotic prophylaxis and surgical repair. Surgical intervention may be necessary in patients with persistent reflux, renal scarring, and recurrent or breakthrough febrile UTI. Both open and endoscopic approaches to reflux correction are successful and reduce the occurrence of febrile UTI. Estimated success rates of open and endoscopic reflux correction are 98.1% (95% CI 95.1, 99.1) and 83.0% (95% CI 69.1, 91.4), respectively. Factors that affect the success of endoscopic injection include pre-operative reflux grade and presence of functional or anatomic bladder abnormalities including voiding dysfunction and duplicated collecting systems. Few studies have evaluated the long-term outcomes of endoscopic injection, and with variable results. In patients treated endoscopically, recurrent febrile UTI occurred in 0-21%, new renal damage in 9-12%, and recurrent reflux in 17-47.6% of treated ureters with at least 1 year follow-up. These studies highlight the need for standardized outcome reporting and longer follow-up after endoscopic treatment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)551-561
Number of pages11
JournalPediatric Nephrology
Volume27
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2012

Fingerprint

Vesico-Ureteral Reflux
Urinary Tract Infections
Fever
Kidney
Cicatrix
Injections
Antibiotic Prophylaxis
Pyelonephritis
Ureter
Urinary Bladder
Observation
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Endoscopy
  • Laparoscopy
  • Surgery
  • Uropathy
  • Vesicoureteral reflux

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nephrology
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Surgical management of vesicoureteral reflux in children. / Sung, Jennifer; Skoog, Steven.

In: Pediatric Nephrology, Vol. 27, No. 4, 04.2012, p. 551-561.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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