Surgeon-reported conflict with intensivists about postoperative goals of care.

Terrah J. Paul Olson, Karen J. Brasel, Andrew J. Redmann, G. Caleb Alexander, Margaret L. Schwarze

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

To examine surgeons' experiences of conflict with intensivists and nurses about goals of care for their postoperative patients. Cross-sectional incentivized US mail-based survey. Private and academic surgical practices. A total of 2100 vascular, neurologic, and cardiothoracic surgeons. Surgeon-reported rates of conflict with intensivists and nurses about goals of care for patients with poor postsurgical outcomes. The adjusted response rate was 55.6%. Forty-three percent of surgeons reported sometimes or always experiencing conflict about postoperative goals of care with intensivists, and 43% reported conflict with nurses. Younger surgeons reported higher rates of conflict than older surgeons with both intensivists (57% vs 32%; P = .001) and nurses (48% vs 33%; P = .001). Surgeons practicing in closed intensive care units reported more frequent conflict than those practicing in open intensive care units (60% vs 41%; P = .005). On multivariate analysis, the odds of reporting conflict with intensivists were 2.5 times higher for surgeons with fewer years of experience compared with their older colleagues (odds ratio, 2.5; 95% CI, 1.6-3.8) and 70% higher for reporting conflict with nurses (odds ratio, 1.7; 95% CI, 1.1-2.6). The odds of reporting conflict with intensivists about goals of postoperative care were 40% lower for surgeons who primarily managed their intensive care unit patients than for those who worked in a closed unit (odds ratio, 0.60; 95% CI, 0.40-0.96). Surgeons regularly experience conflict with critical care clinicians about goals of care for patients with poor postoperative outcomes. Higher rates of conflict are associated with less experience and working in a closed intensive care unit.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)29-35
Number of pages7
JournalJAMA Surgery
Volume148
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 2013
Externally publishedYes

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Patient Care Planning
Postoperative Care
Nurses
Intensive Care Units
Odds Ratio
Surgeons
Postal Service
Critical Care
Nervous System
Blood Vessels
Multivariate Analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Paul Olson, T. J., Brasel, K. J., Redmann, A. J., Alexander, G. C., & Schwarze, M. L. (2013). Surgeon-reported conflict with intensivists about postoperative goals of care. JAMA Surgery, 148(1), 29-35.

Surgeon-reported conflict with intensivists about postoperative goals of care. / Paul Olson, Terrah J.; Brasel, Karen J.; Redmann, Andrew J.; Alexander, G. Caleb; Schwarze, Margaret L.

In: JAMA Surgery, Vol. 148, No. 1, 01.2013, p. 29-35.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Paul Olson, TJ, Brasel, KJ, Redmann, AJ, Alexander, GC & Schwarze, ML 2013, 'Surgeon-reported conflict with intensivists about postoperative goals of care.', JAMA Surgery, vol. 148, no. 1, pp. 29-35.
Paul Olson TJ, Brasel KJ, Redmann AJ, Alexander GC, Schwarze ML. Surgeon-reported conflict with intensivists about postoperative goals of care. JAMA Surgery. 2013 Jan;148(1):29-35.
Paul Olson, Terrah J. ; Brasel, Karen J. ; Redmann, Andrew J. ; Alexander, G. Caleb ; Schwarze, Margaret L. / Surgeon-reported conflict with intensivists about postoperative goals of care. In: JAMA Surgery. 2013 ; Vol. 148, No. 1. pp. 29-35.
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