Superposition of virtual sources: accelerated modeling of light distribution in heterogeneous tissues

M. R. Ostermeyer, Steven Jacques, A. H. Hielscher, L. Wang

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

We present a new method of called 'Superposition of Virtual Sources' (SVS), that combines the speed of diffusion theory with the ability of modeling complex geometries. Modeling the light distribution in tissues under the existing methods, Monte Carlo simulation is known for its accuracy and flexibility in treating complex geometries. Under the existing methods, Monte carlo simulation is known for its accuracy and flexibility in treating complex geometries. However, these advantages are countered by very extensive computation times. Analytical solutions found from diffusion theory can be calculated very fast but are limited to special simple geometries. The SVS method, which models a sphere with 57 virtual sources, is found to be in good agreement with the other two methods. However, SVS excels in computation time. The Monte Carlo simulation took 5 days, the diffusion theory analytical solution was evaluated with a Mathematica routine in 2 hours, while the SVS-solution was generated in 5 seconds (all on a sun sparc10-workstation).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationConference on Lasers and Electro-Optics Europe - Technical Digest
PublisherIEEE
StatePublished - 1994
Externally publishedYes
EventProceedings of the 1994 Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics Europe - Amsterdam, Neth
Duration: Aug 28 1994Sep 2 1994

Other

OtherProceedings of the 1994 Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics Europe
CityAmsterdam, Neth
Period8/28/949/2/94

Fingerprint

Tissue
Geometry
Sun
Monte Carlo simulation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Control and Systems Engineering
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

Cite this

Ostermeyer, M. R., Jacques, S., Hielscher, A. H., & Wang, L. (1994). Superposition of virtual sources: accelerated modeling of light distribution in heterogeneous tissues. In Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics Europe - Technical Digest IEEE.

Superposition of virtual sources : accelerated modeling of light distribution in heterogeneous tissues. / Ostermeyer, M. R.; Jacques, Steven; Hielscher, A. H.; Wang, L.

Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics Europe - Technical Digest. IEEE, 1994.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Ostermeyer, MR, Jacques, S, Hielscher, AH & Wang, L 1994, Superposition of virtual sources: accelerated modeling of light distribution in heterogeneous tissues. in Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics Europe - Technical Digest. IEEE, Proceedings of the 1994 Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics Europe, Amsterdam, Neth, 8/28/94.
Ostermeyer MR, Jacques S, Hielscher AH, Wang L. Superposition of virtual sources: accelerated modeling of light distribution in heterogeneous tissues. In Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics Europe - Technical Digest. IEEE. 1994
Ostermeyer, M. R. ; Jacques, Steven ; Hielscher, A. H. ; Wang, L. / Superposition of virtual sources : accelerated modeling of light distribution in heterogeneous tissues. Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics Europe - Technical Digest. IEEE, 1994.
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