[15O]H2O positron emission tomography determination of cerebral blood flow during balloon test occlusion of the internal carotid artery

J. A. Brunberg, K. A. Frey, J. A. Horton, J. P. Deveikis, D. A. Ross, R. A. Koeppe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

56 Scopus citations

Abstract

PURPOSE: To determine the utility of [15O]H2O positron emission tomography (PET) for the quantitative determination of cerebral blood flow in patients undergoing balloon test occlusion of the internal carotid artery. METHODS: Twenty-two [15O]H2O PET cerebral blood flow studies were completed on 20 patients for whom temporary or permanent occlusion of the internal carotid artery was being considered because of skull base tumor or internal carotid artery aneurysm. In each study, cerebral blood flow was determined during temporary balloon internal carotid artery occlusion, and again after deflation and removal of the balloon from the internal carotid artery. RESULTS: Patients were divided into three groups based on clinical and cerebral blood flow response to balloon test occlusion. Studies were classified as group I when associated with no clinical symptomatology and with a cerebral blood flow decrease of less than 10 mL/100 g per minute (16 of 22 patients); as group II when there was no clinical symptomatology and cerebral blood flow fell to 25 to 35 mL/100 g per minute on the occluded side (5 of 22); and as group III when the patient was clinically unable to tolerate test occlusion and had a cerebral blood flow of less than 20 mL/100 g per minute on the occluded side (1 of 22). Neurologic sequelae developed in none of the eight group I patients later undergoing permanent internal carotid artery occlusion. Cerebral infarction developed subsequently in the one group II patient who underwent internal carotid artery occlusion. CONCLUSION: During internal carotid artery balloon test occlusion, [15O]H2O PET determination of cerebral blood flow allows rapid quantitative determination of cerebral blood flow throughout the entire brain, predicting the adequacy of collateral flow after permanent occlusion. All patients were able to tolerate the [15O]H2O PET cerebral blood flow determination, and there were no complications of the procedure.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)725-732
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Neuroradiology
Volume15
Issue number4
StatePublished - May 3 1994

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Clinical Neurology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of '[<sup>15</sup>O]H<sub>2</sub>O positron emission tomography determination of cerebral blood flow during balloon test occlusion of the internal carotid artery'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this