Subversion of integrins by enteropathogenic Yersinia

Ralph R. Isberg, Penelope Barnes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

92 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Enteropathogenic Yersinia are gram-negative bacterial species that translocate from the lumen of the intestine and are able to grow within deep tissue sites. During the earliest stages of disease, the organism is able to bind integrin receptors that are presented on the apical surface of M cells in the intestine, which allows its internalization and subsequent translocation into regional lymph nodes. The primary integrin substrate is the outer-membrane protein invasin, which binds with extraordinarily high affinity to at least five different integrins that have the β1 chain. Bacterial uptake into host cells is modulated by the affinity of receptor-substrate interaction, receptor concentration and the ability of the substrate to aggregate target receptors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)21-28
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Cell Science
Volume114
Issue number1
StatePublished - 2001
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Yersinia
Integrins
Intestines
Membrane Proteins
Lymph Nodes

Keywords

  • Integrin
  • Invasin
  • M-cell uptake
  • Yersinia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Isberg, R. R., & Barnes, P. (2001). Subversion of integrins by enteropathogenic Yersinia. Journal of Cell Science, 114(1), 21-28.

Subversion of integrins by enteropathogenic Yersinia. / Isberg, Ralph R.; Barnes, Penelope.

In: Journal of Cell Science, Vol. 114, No. 1, 2001, p. 21-28.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Isberg, RR & Barnes, P 2001, 'Subversion of integrins by enteropathogenic Yersinia', Journal of Cell Science, vol. 114, no. 1, pp. 21-28.
Isberg, Ralph R. ; Barnes, Penelope. / Subversion of integrins by enteropathogenic Yersinia. In: Journal of Cell Science. 2001 ; Vol. 114, No. 1. pp. 21-28.
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