Subjective risk vs. objective risk can lead to different post-cesarean birth decisions based on multiattribute modeling

Poonam S. Sharma, Karen Eden, Jeanne-Marie Guise, Holly B. Jimison, James G. Dolan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To compare birth recommendations for pregnant women with a prior cesarean produced from a decision model using absolute risks vs. one using subjective interpretation of the same risks: (1) a multiattribute decision model based on patient prioritization of risks (subjective risk) and (2) a hybrid model that used absolute risks (objective risk). Study Design and Setting: The subjective risk multiattribute model used the Analytic Hierarchy Process to elicit priorities for maternal risks, neonatal risks, and the delivery experience from 96 postnatal women with a prior cesarean. The hybrid model combined the priorities for delivery experience obtained in the first model with the unadjusted absolute risk values. Results: The multiattribute model generated more recommendations for repeat cesarean delivery than the hybrid model: 73% vs. 18%, (P-value

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)67-78
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Clinical Epidemiology
Volume64
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2011

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Parturition
Pregnant Women
Mothers

Keywords

  • Analytic Hierarchy Process
  • Childbirth
  • Decision tree
  • Risk communication
  • Shared decision making
  • VBAC

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology

Cite this

Subjective risk vs. objective risk can lead to different post-cesarean birth decisions based on multiattribute modeling. / Sharma, Poonam S.; Eden, Karen; Guise, Jeanne-Marie; Jimison, Holly B.; Dolan, James G.

In: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology, Vol. 64, No. 1, 01.2011, p. 67-78.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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