Study of Optimal Perimetric Testing In Children (OPTIC): developing consensus and setting research priorities for perimetry in the management of children with glaucoma

For the OPTIC Study Group

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Perimetry is important in the management of children with glaucoma, but there is limited evidence-based guidance on its use. We report an expert consensus-based study to update guidance and identify areas requiring further research. Methods: Experts were invited to participate in a modified Delphi consensus process. Panel selection was based on clinical experience of managing children with glaucoma and UK-based training to minimise diversity of view due to healthcare setting. Questionnaires were delivered electronically, and analysed to establish ‘agreement’. Divergence of opinions was investigated and resolved where possible through further iterations. Results: 7/9 experts invited agreed to participate. Consensus (≥5/7 (71%) in agreement) was achieved for 21/26 (80.8%) items in 2 rounds, generating recommendations to start perimetry from approximately 7 years of age (IQR: 6.75–7.25), and use qualitative methods in conjunction with automated reliability indices to assess test quality. There was a lack of agreement about defining progressive visual field (VF) loss and methods for implementing perimetry longitudinally. Panel members highlighted the importance of informing decisions based upon individual circumstances—from gauging maturity/capability when selecting tests and interpreting outcomes, to accounting for specific clinical features (e.g. poor IOP control and/or suspected progressive VF loss) when making decisions about frequency of testing. Conclusions: There is commonality of expert views in relation to implementing perimetry and interpreting test quality in the management of children with glaucoma. However, there remains a lack of agreement about defining progressive VF loss, and utilising perimetry over an individuals’ lifetime, highlighting the need for further research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalEye (Basingstoke)
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology
  • Sensory Systems

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Study of Optimal Perimetric Testing In Children (OPTIC): developing consensus and setting research priorities for perimetry in the management of children with glaucoma'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this