Structured simulations improves students’ knowledge acquisition and perceptions of teaching effectiveness: A quasi-experimental study

Asma A. Taha, Ahlam Jadalla, Wafaa Bin Ali, Jenny Firkins, Sharon Norman, Najood Azar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Aims: To determine the effect of adding structured simulation to a traditional classroom lecture format on students’ knowledge acquisition and their evaluation of faculty teaching effectiveness, compared to traditional classroom lectures alone. Background: There is a critical lack of high-quality clinical placements/experiences in nursing education, particularly in clinical specialty populations, such as paediatrics. Simulation has been shown to help students practice in a safe environment. However, less is known about the outcomes of embedding simulation in didactic class sessions or classroom lectures. Additionally, data on the impact of simulation as a teaching pedagogy on faculty teaching effectiveness is limited. Design: Post-test, nonequivalent control group quasi-experimental study. Methods: Students in two prelicensure nursing programs participated in a 10-week term paediatric nursing course taught by the same faculty member on two different campuses. The students at one campus, designated as the control group (n = 43), received four hours of traditional, lecture-only, instructions. The group at a second campus, the intervention group (n = 44), received the same lectures with added structured simulations. Students’ knowledge acquisition and their evaluation of faculty teaching effectiveness were measured in both groups using the same standardised assessment measures. The CONSORT checklist was followed. Results: Students’ knowledge acquisition scores and their evaluation scores of faculty teaching effectiveness were significantly higher in the intervention (simulation) group compared to the control group. A significantly higher number of students in the simulation group scored above the national average Nursing Care of Children score as compared to students in the control group. Conclusions: Integrating simulation with didactic instruction enhanced students’ knowledge acquisition and improved their opinion of faculty teaching effectiveness. Relevance to clinical practice: Augmenting lecture with simulation may provide students with learning experiences that they may not have during clinical rotation due to a lack of paediatric clinical placement sites and differences between sites.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Clinical Nursing
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021

Keywords

  • faculty evaluation
  • nursing education
  • paediatric nursing
  • simulation
  • teaching methods

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)

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