Strain differences in behavioral inhibition in a go/No-go task demonstrated using 15 inbred mouse strains

Noah R. Gubner, Clare Wilhelm, Tamara Phillips, Suzanne Mitchell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

36 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: High levels of impulsivity have been associated with a number of substance abuse disorders including alcohol abuse. Research has not yet revealed whether these high levels predate the development of alcohol abuse. Methods: The current study examined impulsivity in 15 inbred strains of mice (A/HeJ, AKR/J, BALB/cJ, C3H/HeJ, C57BL/6J, C57L/J, C58/J, CBA/J, DBA/1J, DBA/2J, NZB/B1NJ, PL/J, SJL/J, SWR/J, and 129P3/J) using a Go/No-go task, which was designed to measure a subject's ability to inhibit a behavior. Numerous aspects of response to ethanol and other drugs of abuse have been examined in these strains. Results: There were significant strain differences in the number of responses made during the No-go signal (false alarms) and the extent to which strains responded differentially during the Go and No-go signals (d'). The rate of responding prior to the cue did not differ among strains, although there was a statistically significant correlation between false alarms and precue responding that was not related to basal activity level. Interstrain correlations suggested that false alarms and rate of responding were associated with strain differences in ethanol-related traits from the published literature. Conclusions: The results of this study do support a link between innate level of impulsivity and response to ethanol and are consistent with a genetic basis for some measures of behavioral inhibition.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1353-1362
Number of pages10
JournalAlcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research
Volume34
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2010

Fingerprint

Inbred Strains Mice
Impulsive Behavior
Ethanol
Alcoholism
Aptitude
Street Drugs
Prednisolone
Substance-Related Disorders
Cues
Alcohols
Research
Inhibition (Psychology)

Keywords

  • Ethanol
  • Go/No-go
  • Heritability
  • Impulsivity
  • Inbred Strains
  • Inhibition
  • Locomotion
  • Mice

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Toxicology

Cite this

Strain differences in behavioral inhibition in a go/No-go task demonstrated using 15 inbred mouse strains. / Gubner, Noah R.; Wilhelm, Clare; Phillips, Tamara; Mitchell, Suzanne.

In: Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, Vol. 34, No. 8, 08.2010, p. 1353-1362.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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