Stimulus-responsive light coupling and modulation with nanofiber waveguide junctions

Ilsun Yoon, Kanguk Kim, Sarah E. Baker, Daniel Heineck, Sadik Esener, Donald J. Sirbuly

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We report a systematic study of light coupling at junctions of overlapping SnO 2 nanofiber waveguides (WGs) as a function of gap separation and guided wavelength. The junctions were assembled on silica substrates using micromanipulation techniques and the gap separation was controlled by depositing thin self-assembled polyelectrolyte coatings at the fiber junctions. We demonstrate that the coupling efficiency is strongly dependent on the gap separation, showing strong fluctuations (0.1 dB/nm) in the power transfer when the separation between nanofibers changes by as little as 2 nm. Experimental results correlate well with numerical simulations using three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain techniques. To demonstrate the feasibility of using coupled nanofiber WGs to modulate light, we encased the junctions in an environment-responsive matrix and exposed the junctions to gaseous vapor. The nanofiber junctions show an ∼95% (or ∼80%) modulation of the guided 450 nm (or 510 nm) light upon interaction with the gaseous molecules. The results reveal a unique nanofiber-based sensing scheme that does not require a change in the refractive index to detect stimuli, suggesting these structures could play important roles in localized sensing devices including force-based measurements or novel chemically induced light modulators.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1905-1911
Number of pages7
JournalNano Letters
Volume12
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 11 2012
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Waveguide junctions
Nanofibers
stimuli
Modulation
waveguides
modulation
Waveguides
Light modulators
Polyelectrolytes
Silicon Dioxide
light modulators
Refractive index
Vapors
Silica
Coatings
Wavelength
Molecules
vapors
refractivity
Fibers

Keywords

  • evanescent field
  • light modulation
  • nanophotonics
  • Semiconductor nanowire
  • sensor
  • subwavelength waveguide

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Bioengineering
  • Chemistry(all)
  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Materials Science(all)
  • Condensed Matter Physics

Cite this

Stimulus-responsive light coupling and modulation with nanofiber waveguide junctions. / Yoon, Ilsun; Kim, Kanguk; Baker, Sarah E.; Heineck, Daniel; Esener, Sadik; Sirbuly, Donald J.

In: Nano Letters, Vol. 12, No. 4, 11.04.2012, p. 1905-1911.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Yoon, I, Kim, K, Baker, SE, Heineck, D, Esener, S & Sirbuly, DJ 2012, 'Stimulus-responsive light coupling and modulation with nanofiber waveguide junctions', Nano Letters, vol. 12, no. 4, pp. 1905-1911. https://doi.org/10.1021/nl2043024
Yoon, Ilsun ; Kim, Kanguk ; Baker, Sarah E. ; Heineck, Daniel ; Esener, Sadik ; Sirbuly, Donald J. / Stimulus-responsive light coupling and modulation with nanofiber waveguide junctions. In: Nano Letters. 2012 ; Vol. 12, No. 4. pp. 1905-1911.
@article{a8aa9b9c18ba4cc89e28fb44286abb81,
title = "Stimulus-responsive light coupling and modulation with nanofiber waveguide junctions",
abstract = "We report a systematic study of light coupling at junctions of overlapping SnO 2 nanofiber waveguides (WGs) as a function of gap separation and guided wavelength. The junctions were assembled on silica substrates using micromanipulation techniques and the gap separation was controlled by depositing thin self-assembled polyelectrolyte coatings at the fiber junctions. We demonstrate that the coupling efficiency is strongly dependent on the gap separation, showing strong fluctuations (0.1 dB/nm) in the power transfer when the separation between nanofibers changes by as little as 2 nm. Experimental results correlate well with numerical simulations using three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain techniques. To demonstrate the feasibility of using coupled nanofiber WGs to modulate light, we encased the junctions in an environment-responsive matrix and exposed the junctions to gaseous vapor. The nanofiber junctions show an ∼95{\%} (or ∼80{\%}) modulation of the guided 450 nm (or 510 nm) light upon interaction with the gaseous molecules. The results reveal a unique nanofiber-based sensing scheme that does not require a change in the refractive index to detect stimuli, suggesting these structures could play important roles in localized sensing devices including force-based measurements or novel chemically induced light modulators.",
keywords = "evanescent field, light modulation, nanophotonics, Semiconductor nanowire, sensor, subwavelength waveguide",
author = "Ilsun Yoon and Kanguk Kim and Baker, {Sarah E.} and Daniel Heineck and Sadik Esener and Sirbuly, {Donald J.}",
year = "2012",
month = "4",
day = "11",
doi = "10.1021/nl2043024",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "12",
pages = "1905--1911",
journal = "Nano Letters",
issn = "1530-6984",
publisher = "American Chemical Society",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Stimulus-responsive light coupling and modulation with nanofiber waveguide junctions

AU - Yoon, Ilsun

AU - Kim, Kanguk

AU - Baker, Sarah E.

AU - Heineck, Daniel

AU - Esener, Sadik

AU - Sirbuly, Donald J.

PY - 2012/4/11

Y1 - 2012/4/11

N2 - We report a systematic study of light coupling at junctions of overlapping SnO 2 nanofiber waveguides (WGs) as a function of gap separation and guided wavelength. The junctions were assembled on silica substrates using micromanipulation techniques and the gap separation was controlled by depositing thin self-assembled polyelectrolyte coatings at the fiber junctions. We demonstrate that the coupling efficiency is strongly dependent on the gap separation, showing strong fluctuations (0.1 dB/nm) in the power transfer when the separation between nanofibers changes by as little as 2 nm. Experimental results correlate well with numerical simulations using three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain techniques. To demonstrate the feasibility of using coupled nanofiber WGs to modulate light, we encased the junctions in an environment-responsive matrix and exposed the junctions to gaseous vapor. The nanofiber junctions show an ∼95% (or ∼80%) modulation of the guided 450 nm (or 510 nm) light upon interaction with the gaseous molecules. The results reveal a unique nanofiber-based sensing scheme that does not require a change in the refractive index to detect stimuli, suggesting these structures could play important roles in localized sensing devices including force-based measurements or novel chemically induced light modulators.

AB - We report a systematic study of light coupling at junctions of overlapping SnO 2 nanofiber waveguides (WGs) as a function of gap separation and guided wavelength. The junctions were assembled on silica substrates using micromanipulation techniques and the gap separation was controlled by depositing thin self-assembled polyelectrolyte coatings at the fiber junctions. We demonstrate that the coupling efficiency is strongly dependent on the gap separation, showing strong fluctuations (0.1 dB/nm) in the power transfer when the separation between nanofibers changes by as little as 2 nm. Experimental results correlate well with numerical simulations using three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain techniques. To demonstrate the feasibility of using coupled nanofiber WGs to modulate light, we encased the junctions in an environment-responsive matrix and exposed the junctions to gaseous vapor. The nanofiber junctions show an ∼95% (or ∼80%) modulation of the guided 450 nm (or 510 nm) light upon interaction with the gaseous molecules. The results reveal a unique nanofiber-based sensing scheme that does not require a change in the refractive index to detect stimuli, suggesting these structures could play important roles in localized sensing devices including force-based measurements or novel chemically induced light modulators.

KW - evanescent field

KW - light modulation

KW - nanophotonics

KW - Semiconductor nanowire

KW - sensor

KW - subwavelength waveguide

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84859707179&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84859707179&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1021/nl2043024

DO - 10.1021/nl2043024

M3 - Article

C2 - 22449127

AN - SCOPUS:84859707179

VL - 12

SP - 1905

EP - 1911

JO - Nano Letters

JF - Nano Letters

SN - 1530-6984

IS - 4

ER -