Status of neurology medical school education: Results of 2005 and 2012 clerkship director survey

Jonathan L. Carter, Imran I. Ali, Richard S. Isaacson, Joseph E. Safdieh, Glen R. Finney, Michael K. Sowell, Maria C. Sam, Heather S. Anderson, Robert K. Shin, Jeff Kraakevik, Mary Coleman, Oksana Drogan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To survey all US medical school clerkship directors (CDs) in neurology and to compare results from a similar survey in 2005. Methods: A survey was developed by a work group of the American Academy of Neurology Undergraduate Education Subcommittee, and sent to all neurology CDs listed in the American Academy of Neurology database. Comparisons were made to a similar 2005 survey. Results: Survey response rate was 73%. Neurology was required in 93% of responding schools. Duration of clerkships was 4 weeks in 74% and 3 weeks in 11%. Clerkships were taken in the third year in 56%, third or fourth year in 19%, and fourth year in 12%. Clerkship duration in 2012 was slightly shorter than in 2005 (fewer clerkships of $4 weeks, p 5 0.125), but more clerkships have moved into the third year (fewer neurology clerkships during the fourth year, p 5 0.051). Simulation training in lumbar punctures was available at 44%of schools, but only 2% of students attempted lumbar punctures on patients. CDs averaged 20% protected time, but reported that they needed at least 32%. Secretarial full-time equivalent was 0.50 or less in 71% of clerkships. Eighty-five percent of CDs were "very satisfied" or "somewhat satisfied," but more than half experienced "burnout" and 35% had considered relinquishing their role. Conclusion: Trends in neurology undergraduate education since 2005 include shorter clerkships, migration into the third year, and increasing use of technology. CDs are generally satisfied, but report stressors, including inadequate protected time and departmental support.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1761-1766
Number of pages6
JournalNeurology
Volume83
Issue number19
StatePublished - Nov 1 2014

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Neurology
Medical Education
Medical Schools
Spinal Puncture
Education
Surveys and Questionnaires
Databases
Students
Technology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Carter, J. L., Ali, I. I., Isaacson, R. S., Safdieh, J. E., Finney, G. R., Sowell, M. K., ... Drogan, O. (2014). Status of neurology medical school education: Results of 2005 and 2012 clerkship director survey. Neurology, 83(19), 1761-1766.

Status of neurology medical school education : Results of 2005 and 2012 clerkship director survey. / Carter, Jonathan L.; Ali, Imran I.; Isaacson, Richard S.; Safdieh, Joseph E.; Finney, Glen R.; Sowell, Michael K.; Sam, Maria C.; Anderson, Heather S.; Shin, Robert K.; Kraakevik, Jeff; Coleman, Mary; Drogan, Oksana.

In: Neurology, Vol. 83, No. 19, 01.11.2014, p. 1761-1766.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Carter, JL, Ali, II, Isaacson, RS, Safdieh, JE, Finney, GR, Sowell, MK, Sam, MC, Anderson, HS, Shin, RK, Kraakevik, J, Coleman, M & Drogan, O 2014, 'Status of neurology medical school education: Results of 2005 and 2012 clerkship director survey', Neurology, vol. 83, no. 19, pp. 1761-1766.
Carter JL, Ali II, Isaacson RS, Safdieh JE, Finney GR, Sowell MK et al. Status of neurology medical school education: Results of 2005 and 2012 clerkship director survey. Neurology. 2014 Nov 1;83(19):1761-1766.
Carter, Jonathan L. ; Ali, Imran I. ; Isaacson, Richard S. ; Safdieh, Joseph E. ; Finney, Glen R. ; Sowell, Michael K. ; Sam, Maria C. ; Anderson, Heather S. ; Shin, Robert K. ; Kraakevik, Jeff ; Coleman, Mary ; Drogan, Oksana. / Status of neurology medical school education : Results of 2005 and 2012 clerkship director survey. In: Neurology. 2014 ; Vol. 83, No. 19. pp. 1761-1766.
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AU - Finney, Glen R.

AU - Sowell, Michael K.

AU - Sam, Maria C.

AU - Anderson, Heather S.

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AU - Kraakevik, Jeff

AU - Coleman, Mary

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N2 - Objective: To survey all US medical school clerkship directors (CDs) in neurology and to compare results from a similar survey in 2005. Methods: A survey was developed by a work group of the American Academy of Neurology Undergraduate Education Subcommittee, and sent to all neurology CDs listed in the American Academy of Neurology database. Comparisons were made to a similar 2005 survey. Results: Survey response rate was 73%. Neurology was required in 93% of responding schools. Duration of clerkships was 4 weeks in 74% and 3 weeks in 11%. Clerkships were taken in the third year in 56%, third or fourth year in 19%, and fourth year in 12%. Clerkship duration in 2012 was slightly shorter than in 2005 (fewer clerkships of $4 weeks, p 5 0.125), but more clerkships have moved into the third year (fewer neurology clerkships during the fourth year, p 5 0.051). Simulation training in lumbar punctures was available at 44%of schools, but only 2% of students attempted lumbar punctures on patients. CDs averaged 20% protected time, but reported that they needed at least 32%. Secretarial full-time equivalent was 0.50 or less in 71% of clerkships. Eighty-five percent of CDs were "very satisfied" or "somewhat satisfied," but more than half experienced "burnout" and 35% had considered relinquishing their role. Conclusion: Trends in neurology undergraduate education since 2005 include shorter clerkships, migration into the third year, and increasing use of technology. CDs are generally satisfied, but report stressors, including inadequate protected time and departmental support.

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