Staff attitudes towards people with intellectual disabilities in Japan and the United States

Willi Horner-Johnson, C. B. Keys, D. Henry, K. Yamaki, K. Watanabe, F. Oi, I. Fujimura, B. C. Graham, H. Shimada

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Staff attitudes may affect choices available to persons with intellectual disabilities (ID). This study examined attitudes towards people with ID among staff working with people with ID in Japan and the United States. Method: Attitudes of staff working with people with ID in Japan and the United States were compared using the Community Living Attitudes Scale, Intellectual Disabilities Form. Responses were examined via multivariate analysis of variance. Results: In unadjusted analyses, Japanese staff exhibited a greater tendency towards Sheltering and Exclusion of people with ID and lower endorsement of Empowerment and Similarity of people with ID. After controlling for covariates, the country effect was no longer significant for Sheltering and Exclusion. Age and education were significantly associated with attitudes in the adjusted model. Conclusions: While attitudes in Japan appeared less supportive of community inclusion of people with ID, some of the differences between countries were attributable to other staff characteristics such as age and education. Findings provide new information about how attitudes of staff in each country compare with each other.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)942-947
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Intellectual Disability Research
Volume59
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2015

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Attitude of Health Personnel
Disabled Persons
Intellectual Disability
Japan
Education
Staff
Analysis of Variance
Multivariate Analysis

Keywords

  • Attitudes
  • Community inclusion
  • Cross-cultural comparison
  • Intellectual disability
  • Staff

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neurology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Rehabilitation
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Staff attitudes towards people with intellectual disabilities in Japan and the United States. / Horner-Johnson, Willi; Keys, C. B.; Henry, D.; Yamaki, K.; Watanabe, K.; Oi, F.; Fujimura, I.; Graham, B. C.; Shimada, H.

In: Journal of Intellectual Disability Research, Vol. 59, No. 10, 01.10.2015, p. 942-947.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Horner-Johnson, W, Keys, CB, Henry, D, Yamaki, K, Watanabe, K, Oi, F, Fujimura, I, Graham, BC & Shimada, H 2015, 'Staff attitudes towards people with intellectual disabilities in Japan and the United States', Journal of Intellectual Disability Research, vol. 59, no. 10, pp. 942-947. https://doi.org/10.1111/jir.12179
Horner-Johnson, Willi ; Keys, C. B. ; Henry, D. ; Yamaki, K. ; Watanabe, K. ; Oi, F. ; Fujimura, I. ; Graham, B. C. ; Shimada, H. / Staff attitudes towards people with intellectual disabilities in Japan and the United States. In: Journal of Intellectual Disability Research. 2015 ; Vol. 59, No. 10. pp. 942-947.
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