Sport-related concussion

Factors associated with prolonged return to play

Chad A. Asplund, Douglas McKeag, Cara H. Olsen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

54 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To assess predictive value of concussion signs and symptoms based on return-to-play timelines. Design: Physician practice study without diagnosis that includes presentation, initial and subsequent treatment, and management of concussion. Setting: National multisite primary care sports medicine provider locations. Participants: Twenty-two providers at 18 sites; 101 athletes (91 men, 10 women in the following sports: 73 football, 8 basketball, 8 soccer, 3 wrestling, 2 lacrosse, 2 skiing, 5 others; 51 college, 44 high school, 4 professional, and 2 recreational). Main Outcome Measurements: Duration of symptoms, presence of clinical signs, and time to return to play following concussion. Results: One hundred one concussions were analyzed. Pearson χ2 analysis of common early and late concussion symptoms revealed statistical significance (P < 0.05) of headache >3 hours, difficulty concentrating >3 hours, any retrograde amnesia or loss of consciousness, and return to play >7 days. There appeared to be a trend in patients with posttraumatic amnesia toward poor outcome, but this was not statistically significant. Conclusions: When evaluating concussion, symptoms of headache >3 hours, difficulty concentrating >3 hours, retrograde amnesia, or loss of consciousness may indicate a more severe injury or prolonged recovery; great caution should be exercised before returning these athletes to play.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)339-343
Number of pages5
JournalClinical Journal of Sport Medicine
Volume14
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2004
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Retrograde Amnesia
Sports
Unconsciousness
Athletes
Racquet Sports
Wrestling
Skiing
Basketball
Sports Medicine
Soccer
Amnesia
Football
Signs and Symptoms
Headache
Primary Health Care
Physicians
Wounds and Injuries
Return to Sport
Therapeutics
TimeLine

Keywords

  • Concussion
  • Outcomes
  • Sports
  • Symptoms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

Sport-related concussion : Factors associated with prolonged return to play. / Asplund, Chad A.; McKeag, Douglas; Olsen, Cara H.

In: Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine, Vol. 14, No. 6, 01.11.2004, p. 339-343.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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