Spiritual coping and psychosocial adjustment of adolescents with chronic illness: The role of cognitive attributions, age, and disease group

Nina Reynolds, Sylvie Mrug, Kimberly Guion

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: Spiritual coping is an important determinant of adjustment in youth with chronic illness, but the mechanisms through which it affects outcomes have not been elucidated. It is also unknown whether the role of spiritual coping varies by age or disease group. This study evaluated whether general cognitive attributions explain the effects of spiritual coping on internalizing and externalizing problems in adolescents with cystic fibrosis and diabetes and whether these relationships vary by age or disease group. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, adolescents (N = 128; M = 14.7 yrs) diagnosed with cystic fibrosis or diabetes completed measures of spiritual coping and attributional style. Adolescents and their caregivers reported on adolescents' internalizing and externalizing problems. Results: Overall, positive spiritual coping was associated with fewer internalizing and externalizing problems. Negative spiritual coping was related to more externalizing problems, and for adolescents with cystic fibrosis only, also internalizing problems. Optimistic attributions mediated the effects of positive spiritual coping among adolescents with diabetes. The results did not vary by age. Conclusions: An optimistic attribution style may help explain the effects of positive, but not negative, spiritual coping on adjustment of youth with diabetes. Youth with progressive, life-threatening illnesses, such as cystic fibrosis, may be more vulnerable to the harmful effects of negative spiritual coping. Future research should examine whether addressing spiritual concerns and promoting optimistic attributions improves adolescents' emotional and behavioral functioning.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)559-565
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Adolescent Health
Volume52
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2013

Fingerprint

Chronic Disease
Age Groups
Cystic Fibrosis
Caregivers
Cross-Sectional Studies

Keywords

  • Adjustment
  • Adolescents
  • Attribution style
  • Chronic illness
  • Spiritual coping

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Spiritual coping and psychosocial adjustment of adolescents with chronic illness : The role of cognitive attributions, age, and disease group. / Reynolds, Nina; Mrug, Sylvie; Guion, Kimberly.

In: Journal of Adolescent Health, Vol. 52, No. 5, 05.2013, p. 559-565.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{a5119d3c9334476fb00db99e24ca2536,
title = "Spiritual coping and psychosocial adjustment of adolescents with chronic illness: The role of cognitive attributions, age, and disease group",
abstract = "Purpose: Spiritual coping is an important determinant of adjustment in youth with chronic illness, but the mechanisms through which it affects outcomes have not been elucidated. It is also unknown whether the role of spiritual coping varies by age or disease group. This study evaluated whether general cognitive attributions explain the effects of spiritual coping on internalizing and externalizing problems in adolescents with cystic fibrosis and diabetes and whether these relationships vary by age or disease group. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, adolescents (N = 128; M = 14.7 yrs) diagnosed with cystic fibrosis or diabetes completed measures of spiritual coping and attributional style. Adolescents and their caregivers reported on adolescents' internalizing and externalizing problems. Results: Overall, positive spiritual coping was associated with fewer internalizing and externalizing problems. Negative spiritual coping was related to more externalizing problems, and for adolescents with cystic fibrosis only, also internalizing problems. Optimistic attributions mediated the effects of positive spiritual coping among adolescents with diabetes. The results did not vary by age. Conclusions: An optimistic attribution style may help explain the effects of positive, but not negative, spiritual coping on adjustment of youth with diabetes. Youth with progressive, life-threatening illnesses, such as cystic fibrosis, may be more vulnerable to the harmful effects of negative spiritual coping. Future research should examine whether addressing spiritual concerns and promoting optimistic attributions improves adolescents' emotional and behavioral functioning.",
keywords = "Adjustment, Adolescents, Attribution style, Chronic illness, Spiritual coping",
author = "Nina Reynolds and Sylvie Mrug and Kimberly Guion",
year = "2013",
month = "5",
doi = "10.1016/j.jadohealth.2012.09.007",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "52",
pages = "559--565",
journal = "Journal of Adolescent Health",
issn = "1054-139X",
publisher = "Elsevier USA",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Spiritual coping and psychosocial adjustment of adolescents with chronic illness

T2 - The role of cognitive attributions, age, and disease group

AU - Reynolds, Nina

AU - Mrug, Sylvie

AU - Guion, Kimberly

PY - 2013/5

Y1 - 2013/5

N2 - Purpose: Spiritual coping is an important determinant of adjustment in youth with chronic illness, but the mechanisms through which it affects outcomes have not been elucidated. It is also unknown whether the role of spiritual coping varies by age or disease group. This study evaluated whether general cognitive attributions explain the effects of spiritual coping on internalizing and externalizing problems in adolescents with cystic fibrosis and diabetes and whether these relationships vary by age or disease group. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, adolescents (N = 128; M = 14.7 yrs) diagnosed with cystic fibrosis or diabetes completed measures of spiritual coping and attributional style. Adolescents and their caregivers reported on adolescents' internalizing and externalizing problems. Results: Overall, positive spiritual coping was associated with fewer internalizing and externalizing problems. Negative spiritual coping was related to more externalizing problems, and for adolescents with cystic fibrosis only, also internalizing problems. Optimistic attributions mediated the effects of positive spiritual coping among adolescents with diabetes. The results did not vary by age. Conclusions: An optimistic attribution style may help explain the effects of positive, but not negative, spiritual coping on adjustment of youth with diabetes. Youth with progressive, life-threatening illnesses, such as cystic fibrosis, may be more vulnerable to the harmful effects of negative spiritual coping. Future research should examine whether addressing spiritual concerns and promoting optimistic attributions improves adolescents' emotional and behavioral functioning.

AB - Purpose: Spiritual coping is an important determinant of adjustment in youth with chronic illness, but the mechanisms through which it affects outcomes have not been elucidated. It is also unknown whether the role of spiritual coping varies by age or disease group. This study evaluated whether general cognitive attributions explain the effects of spiritual coping on internalizing and externalizing problems in adolescents with cystic fibrosis and diabetes and whether these relationships vary by age or disease group. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, adolescents (N = 128; M = 14.7 yrs) diagnosed with cystic fibrosis or diabetes completed measures of spiritual coping and attributional style. Adolescents and their caregivers reported on adolescents' internalizing and externalizing problems. Results: Overall, positive spiritual coping was associated with fewer internalizing and externalizing problems. Negative spiritual coping was related to more externalizing problems, and for adolescents with cystic fibrosis only, also internalizing problems. Optimistic attributions mediated the effects of positive spiritual coping among adolescents with diabetes. The results did not vary by age. Conclusions: An optimistic attribution style may help explain the effects of positive, but not negative, spiritual coping on adjustment of youth with diabetes. Youth with progressive, life-threatening illnesses, such as cystic fibrosis, may be more vulnerable to the harmful effects of negative spiritual coping. Future research should examine whether addressing spiritual concerns and promoting optimistic attributions improves adolescents' emotional and behavioral functioning.

KW - Adjustment

KW - Adolescents

KW - Attribution style

KW - Chronic illness

KW - Spiritual coping

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84876692080&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84876692080&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.jadohealth.2012.09.007

DO - 10.1016/j.jadohealth.2012.09.007

M3 - Article

C2 - 23298988

AN - SCOPUS:84876692080

VL - 52

SP - 559

EP - 565

JO - Journal of Adolescent Health

JF - Journal of Adolescent Health

SN - 1054-139X

IS - 5

ER -