Spinal osteomyelitis after TPN catheter-induced septicemia

F. A. Corso, Bruce Wolfe, B. M. Wolfe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Osteomyelitis of the spine is a well-recognized delayed manifestation of septicemia but has not been recognized as a complication of total parenteral nutrition. We report five cases of spinal osteomyelitis that were clinically recognized 1 to 13 months after total parenteral nutrition catheter-induced septicemia. Radiographic evidence of osteomyelitis was seen in all five patients. In three patients, culture of bony aspirates was positive for the same organism as from the blood. In one case, the diagnosis was established by histology, and in one the diagnosis was based on radiographic and radionuclide evidence of osteomyelitis. The organism responsible was Staphylococcus aureus in two cases, Candida albicans in another two cases and C tropicalis in one case. The septic episode that preceded osteomyelitis was treated with systemic antibiotics and catheter removal in four patients, and antibiotics without catheter removal in one patient. Nevertheless, osteomyelitis occurred, requiring bracing or operative debridement as well as prolonged antibiotic therapy. Spinal osteomyelitis may occur as a delayed manifestation of total parenteral nutrition catheter-induced septicemia. Prompt and effective treatment of septicemia is indicated but may not always be sufficient. Clinical suspicion is the key to the correct and early diagnosis of osteomyelitis and therefore to adequate treatment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)291-295
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition
Volume19
Issue number4
StatePublished - 1995
Externally publishedYes

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osteomyelitis
septicemia
Osteomyelitis
catheters
Sepsis
Catheters
Total Parenteral Nutrition
total parenteral nutrition
antibiotics
Anti-Bacterial Agents
debridement
early diagnosis
organisms
Debridement
radionuclides
Candida albicans
Radioisotopes
histology
Staphylococcus aureus
Early Diagnosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Spinal osteomyelitis after TPN catheter-induced septicemia. / Corso, F. A.; Wolfe, Bruce; Wolfe, B. M.

In: Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, Vol. 19, No. 4, 1995, p. 291-295.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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