Speech Production and Speech with a Phrenic Nerve Pacer

Jeannette D. Hoit, Steven Shea

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A phrenic nerve pacer is a neural prosthesis used by some individuals with ventilatory insufficiency. This report provides a description of the phrenic nerve pacer and contains a case study of a young man in whom speech production during phrenic nerve pacing was examined and contrasted to that during mechanical (positive-pressure) ventilation. Results revealed that the physical mechanisms used to produce speech and the resultant speech output differed under these two ventilatory conditions. Listener judgments indicated that speech produced with a phrenic nerve pacer was strongly preferred over that produced with a mechanical ventilator, primarily because it was more continuous and contained fewer and shorter pauses. This continuity was due, in part, to a conservation-of-air strategy employed by the speaker. These observations have important clinical implications for speech-language pathologists responsible for enhancing spoken communication skills in clients requiring ventilatory support.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)53-60
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Speech-Language Pathology
Volume5
Issue number2
StatePublished - May 1996
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Phrenic Nerve
Neural Prostheses
Positive-Pressure Respiration
Mechanical Ventilators
communication skills
listener
continuity
Language
conservation
Communication
Air
air
language

Keywords

  • Neural prosthesis
  • Phrenic nerve pacer
  • Speech breathing
  • Spinal cord injury
  • Ventilatory insufficiency

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rehabilitation
  • Linguistics and Language
  • Health Professions(all)

Cite this

Speech Production and Speech with a Phrenic Nerve Pacer. / Hoit, Jeannette D.; Shea, Steven.

In: American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, Vol. 5, No. 2, 05.1996, p. 53-60.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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