Soluble thrombomodulin is antithrombotic in the presence of neutralising antibodies to protein C and reduces circulating activated protein C levels in primates

Kenichi A. Tanaka, José A. Fernández, Ulla M. Marzec, Andrew B. Kelly, Mitsunobu Mohri, John H. Griffin, Stephen R. Hanson, Andras Gruber

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We studied whether there was a relationship between the anticoagulant effects of recombinant human soluble thrombomodulin (rhsTM) and activation of protein C in a primate model of acute vascular graft thrombosis in 11 baboons (Papio species). Baboons were pretreated with 0.1, 1 and 5 mg/kg of rhsTM, with or without co-injection of a neutralising monoclonal antibody to protein C (HPC4) in the 1 mg/kg rhsTM group. Subsequently, thrombogenic polyester grafts were deployed for 3 h into chronic exteriorised arteriovenous shunts. Thrombus growth in the graft, plasma-activated protein C (APC) levels, coagulation and thrombosis markers were determined. In untreated baboons, baseline circulating APC levels more than doubled and graft thrombi propagated until reaching equilibrium in about 1 h. Treatment with rhsTM reduced thrombus propagation rates, prolonged the clotting and bleeding times, decreased thrombin- antithrombin complex, β-thromboglobulin and fibrinopeptide A levels, and, surprisingly, also decreased systemic APC levels, in a dose-dependent manner. In the presence of HPC4 antibody to inhibit APC generation, the acute antithrombotic activity of rhsTM on graft thromboses was not attenuated for up to 80 min, but sustained thrombus accumulation was observed over a 180-min period. These findings suggest that, in contrast to the prevailing hypotheses, the primary antithrombotic activity of rhsTM is independent of protein C, at least in this primate model. Direct inhibition of thrombin's prothrombotic activity upon complex formation with rhsTM might explain the molecular mechanism of the observed antithrombotic effect.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)197-203
Number of pages7
JournalBritish Journal of Haematology
Volume132
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2006

Fingerprint

Thrombomodulin
Protein C
Neutralizing Antibodies
Primates
Thrombosis
Papio
Transplants
Fibrinopeptide A
Bleeding Time
Polyesters
human THBD protein
Thrombin
Anticoagulants
Blood Vessels
Blood Proteins
Monoclonal Antibodies
Injections
Antibodies
Growth

Keywords

  • Activated protein C
  • Anticoagulants
  • Thrombin
  • Thrombomodulin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology

Cite this

Soluble thrombomodulin is antithrombotic in the presence of neutralising antibodies to protein C and reduces circulating activated protein C levels in primates. / Tanaka, Kenichi A.; Fernández, José A.; Marzec, Ulla M.; Kelly, Andrew B.; Mohri, Mitsunobu; Griffin, John H.; Hanson, Stephen R.; Gruber, Andras.

In: British Journal of Haematology, Vol. 132, No. 2, 01.2006, p. 197-203.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tanaka, Kenichi A. ; Fernández, José A. ; Marzec, Ulla M. ; Kelly, Andrew B. ; Mohri, Mitsunobu ; Griffin, John H. ; Hanson, Stephen R. ; Gruber, Andras. / Soluble thrombomodulin is antithrombotic in the presence of neutralising antibodies to protein C and reduces circulating activated protein C levels in primates. In: British Journal of Haematology. 2006 ; Vol. 132, No. 2. pp. 197-203.
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