Socioeconomic obstacles to HIV prevention and treatment in developing countries: The roles of the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank

P. Lurie, P. Hintzen, Robert (Bob) Lowe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

79 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper explores the socioeconomic obstacles to HIV prevention and treatment in developing countries. The opening sections explain the historical origins of structural adjustment programs and their characteristics. Structural adjustment programs undermine the social fabric of many developing countries, and potentially promote behaviors which place people at increased risk of HIV infection. The authors discuss the declining sustainability of the rural subsistence economy, development of a transportation infrastructure, migration and urbanization, and reductions in spending on health and social services. Social and economic interventions are needed to stem the spread of HIV and care for those who are already infected. While a substantial amount of biomedical research has been conducted, socioeconomic aspects of the AIDS epidemic have often been ignored. For HIV transmission in developing countries to be substantially reduced, economic policies which may have promoted the spread of disease must be modified. An alternative development strategy consists of satisfying people's basic human needs, shifting from an export-driven economy to diversified agricultural production in the interest of securing regional self-sufficiency, supporting marginal producers and subsistence farmers, and placing greater emphasis upon human resource development in developing countries. Moreover, the IMF and World Bank need to change their policy to one which is truly about cooperative development, while the charters of the IMF and World Bank need to be altered to permit the cancellation or rescheduling of debt. These institutions should also play a leading role in the restructuring of debt owed to private lenders.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)539-546
Number of pages8
JournalAIDS
Volume9
Issue number6
StatePublished - 1995
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

United Nations
Developing Countries
HIV
Social Adjustment
Economics
Staff Development
Urbanization
Therapeutics
Social Work
Health Services
HIV Infections
Biomedical Research
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome

Keywords

  • Africa
  • AIDS policy
  • Asia
  • Economic policy
  • HIV/AIDS
  • International Monetary Fund
  • Migration
  • Structural adjustment
  • World Bank

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Immunology and Allergy

Cite this

Socioeconomic obstacles to HIV prevention and treatment in developing countries : The roles of the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank. / Lurie, P.; Hintzen, P.; Lowe, Robert (Bob).

In: AIDS, Vol. 9, No. 6, 1995, p. 539-546.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{49a1ffcad9994eca9a6dbb96695240a6,
title = "Socioeconomic obstacles to HIV prevention and treatment in developing countries: The roles of the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank",
abstract = "This paper explores the socioeconomic obstacles to HIV prevention and treatment in developing countries. The opening sections explain the historical origins of structural adjustment programs and their characteristics. Structural adjustment programs undermine the social fabric of many developing countries, and potentially promote behaviors which place people at increased risk of HIV infection. The authors discuss the declining sustainability of the rural subsistence economy, development of a transportation infrastructure, migration and urbanization, and reductions in spending on health and social services. Social and economic interventions are needed to stem the spread of HIV and care for those who are already infected. While a substantial amount of biomedical research has been conducted, socioeconomic aspects of the AIDS epidemic have often been ignored. For HIV transmission in developing countries to be substantially reduced, economic policies which may have promoted the spread of disease must be modified. An alternative development strategy consists of satisfying people's basic human needs, shifting from an export-driven economy to diversified agricultural production in the interest of securing regional self-sufficiency, supporting marginal producers and subsistence farmers, and placing greater emphasis upon human resource development in developing countries. Moreover, the IMF and World Bank need to change their policy to one which is truly about cooperative development, while the charters of the IMF and World Bank need to be altered to permit the cancellation or rescheduling of debt. These institutions should also play a leading role in the restructuring of debt owed to private lenders.",
keywords = "Africa, AIDS policy, Asia, Economic policy, HIV/AIDS, International Monetary Fund, Migration, Structural adjustment, World Bank",
author = "P. Lurie and P. Hintzen and Lowe, {Robert (Bob)}",
year = "1995",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "9",
pages = "539--546",
journal = "AIDS",
issn = "0269-9370",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Socioeconomic obstacles to HIV prevention and treatment in developing countries

T2 - The roles of the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank

AU - Lurie, P.

AU - Hintzen, P.

AU - Lowe, Robert (Bob)

PY - 1995

Y1 - 1995

N2 - This paper explores the socioeconomic obstacles to HIV prevention and treatment in developing countries. The opening sections explain the historical origins of structural adjustment programs and their characteristics. Structural adjustment programs undermine the social fabric of many developing countries, and potentially promote behaviors which place people at increased risk of HIV infection. The authors discuss the declining sustainability of the rural subsistence economy, development of a transportation infrastructure, migration and urbanization, and reductions in spending on health and social services. Social and economic interventions are needed to stem the spread of HIV and care for those who are already infected. While a substantial amount of biomedical research has been conducted, socioeconomic aspects of the AIDS epidemic have often been ignored. For HIV transmission in developing countries to be substantially reduced, economic policies which may have promoted the spread of disease must be modified. An alternative development strategy consists of satisfying people's basic human needs, shifting from an export-driven economy to diversified agricultural production in the interest of securing regional self-sufficiency, supporting marginal producers and subsistence farmers, and placing greater emphasis upon human resource development in developing countries. Moreover, the IMF and World Bank need to change their policy to one which is truly about cooperative development, while the charters of the IMF and World Bank need to be altered to permit the cancellation or rescheduling of debt. These institutions should also play a leading role in the restructuring of debt owed to private lenders.

AB - This paper explores the socioeconomic obstacles to HIV prevention and treatment in developing countries. The opening sections explain the historical origins of structural adjustment programs and their characteristics. Structural adjustment programs undermine the social fabric of many developing countries, and potentially promote behaviors which place people at increased risk of HIV infection. The authors discuss the declining sustainability of the rural subsistence economy, development of a transportation infrastructure, migration and urbanization, and reductions in spending on health and social services. Social and economic interventions are needed to stem the spread of HIV and care for those who are already infected. While a substantial amount of biomedical research has been conducted, socioeconomic aspects of the AIDS epidemic have often been ignored. For HIV transmission in developing countries to be substantially reduced, economic policies which may have promoted the spread of disease must be modified. An alternative development strategy consists of satisfying people's basic human needs, shifting from an export-driven economy to diversified agricultural production in the interest of securing regional self-sufficiency, supporting marginal producers and subsistence farmers, and placing greater emphasis upon human resource development in developing countries. Moreover, the IMF and World Bank need to change their policy to one which is truly about cooperative development, while the charters of the IMF and World Bank need to be altered to permit the cancellation or rescheduling of debt. These institutions should also play a leading role in the restructuring of debt owed to private lenders.

KW - Africa

KW - AIDS policy

KW - Asia

KW - Economic policy

KW - HIV/AIDS

KW - International Monetary Fund

KW - Migration

KW - Structural adjustment

KW - World Bank

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0029039230&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0029039230&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 7662190

AN - SCOPUS:0029039230

VL - 9

SP - 539

EP - 546

JO - AIDS

JF - AIDS

SN - 0269-9370

IS - 6

ER -