Smoking cessation and lung function in mild-to-moderate chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: The lung health study

Paul D. Scanlon, John E. Connett, Lance A. Waller, Murray D. Altose, William C. Bailey, A. Sonia Buist, Donald P. Tashkin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

567 Scopus citations

Abstract

Previous studies of lung function in relation to smoking cessation have not adequately quantified the long-term benefit of smoking cessation, nor established the predictive value of characteristics such as airway hyperresponsiveness. In a prospective randomized clinical trial at 10 North American medical centers, we studied 3,926 smokers with mild-to-moderate airway obstruction (3,818 with analyzable results; mean age at entry, 48.5 yr; 36% women) randomized to one of two smoking cessation groups or to a nonintervention group. We measured lung function annually for 5 yr. Participants who stopped smoking experienced an improvement in FEV1 in the year after quitting (an average of 47 ml or 2%). The subsequent rate of decline in FEV1 among sustained quitters was half the rate among continuing smokers, 31 ± 48 versus 62 ± 55 ml (mean ± SD), comparable to that of never-smokers. Predictors of change in lung function included responsiveness to β-agonist, baseline FEV1, methacholine reactivity, age, sex, race, and baseline smoking rate. Respiratory symptoms were not predictive of changes in lung function. Smokers with airflow obstruction benefit from quitting despite previous heavy smoking, advanced age, poor baseline lung function, or airway hyperresponsiveness.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)381-390
Number of pages10
JournalAmerican journal of respiratory and critical care medicine
Volume161
Issue number2 I
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2000

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

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