Smoking and consistently high use of medical care among older HMO members

D. K. Freeborn, J. P. Mullooly, C. R. Pope, Bentson McFarland

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Smoking behavior of consistently high and low users of medical care services compared in two groups of older health maintenance organization (HMO) members continuously enrolled for five years and a subgroup who were continuously enrolled for 10 years. Smokers and former smokers, combined, were more likely than never-smokers to be consistently high users of ambulatory services (52 percent vs 34 percent in the five-year group, and 45 percent vs 30 percent in the 10-year group).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)603-605
Number of pages3
JournalAmerican Journal of Public Health
Volume80
Issue number5
StatePublished - 1990
Externally publishedYes

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Health Maintenance Organizations
Smoking

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Freeborn, D. K., Mullooly, J. P., Pope, C. R., & McFarland, B. (1990). Smoking and consistently high use of medical care among older HMO members. American Journal of Public Health, 80(5), 603-605.

Smoking and consistently high use of medical care among older HMO members. / Freeborn, D. K.; Mullooly, J. P.; Pope, C. R.; McFarland, Bentson.

In: American Journal of Public Health, Vol. 80, No. 5, 1990, p. 603-605.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Freeborn, DK, Mullooly, JP, Pope, CR & McFarland, B 1990, 'Smoking and consistently high use of medical care among older HMO members', American Journal of Public Health, vol. 80, no. 5, pp. 603-605.
Freeborn DK, Mullooly JP, Pope CR, McFarland B. Smoking and consistently high use of medical care among older HMO members. American Journal of Public Health. 1990;80(5):603-605.
Freeborn, D. K. ; Mullooly, J. P. ; Pope, C. R. ; McFarland, Bentson. / Smoking and consistently high use of medical care among older HMO members. In: American Journal of Public Health. 1990 ; Vol. 80, No. 5. pp. 603-605.
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