Slow going - active and passive transport in axons

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Material can be moved throughout a cell in a variety of ways. The simplest manner is diffusion that relies upon a concentration gradient, but needs no external energy source. While efficient for short distances, this technique is not adequate for nerve cells where the axonal processes are quite long and material is synthesized only in the cell body. In this case an energy dependent system is used to actively supply material independent of concentration. In axons, diffusion has been augmented by slow transport which moves cytoskeletal proteins and soluble enzymes at rates of approximately 1 μm/min. Little is known about the mechanisms of slow transport and although culture systems provide ready access to individual axons, the distances involved are often small enough that diffusion contributes a significant amount to the total supply of material. By using a larger isolated system that allows these competing transport effects to be separated we have been able to characterize them individually, and investigate their relative contributions along the axon.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationAnnual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology - Proceedings
PublisherIEEE
Pages401
Number of pages1
Volume1
ISBN (Print)0780356756
StatePublished - 1999
Externally publishedYes
EventProceedings of the 1999 IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology 21st Annual Conference and the 1999 Fall Meeting of the Biomedical Engineering Society (1st Joint BMES / EMBS) - Atlanta, GA, USA
Duration: Oct 13 1999Oct 16 1999

Other

OtherProceedings of the 1999 IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology 21st Annual Conference and the 1999 Fall Meeting of the Biomedical Engineering Society (1st Joint BMES / EMBS)
CityAtlanta, GA, USA
Period10/13/9910/16/99

Fingerprint

Cytoskeletal Proteins
Neurons
Enzymes
Cells
Proteins
Axons

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Bioengineering

Cite this

Galbraith, J. (1999). Slow going - active and passive transport in axons. In Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology - Proceedings (Vol. 1, pp. 401). IEEE.

Slow going - active and passive transport in axons. / Galbraith, James.

Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology - Proceedings. Vol. 1 IEEE, 1999. p. 401.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Galbraith, J 1999, Slow going - active and passive transport in axons. in Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology - Proceedings. vol. 1, IEEE, pp. 401, Proceedings of the 1999 IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology 21st Annual Conference and the 1999 Fall Meeting of the Biomedical Engineering Society (1st Joint BMES / EMBS), Atlanta, GA, USA, 10/13/99.
Galbraith J. Slow going - active and passive transport in axons. In Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology - Proceedings. Vol. 1. IEEE. 1999. p. 401
Galbraith, James. / Slow going - active and passive transport in axons. Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology - Proceedings. Vol. 1 IEEE, 1999. pp. 401
@inproceedings{54668d2cde644333b1bd97a93ed17bc9,
title = "Slow going - active and passive transport in axons",
abstract = "Material can be moved throughout a cell in a variety of ways. The simplest manner is diffusion that relies upon a concentration gradient, but needs no external energy source. While efficient for short distances, this technique is not adequate for nerve cells where the axonal processes are quite long and material is synthesized only in the cell body. In this case an energy dependent system is used to actively supply material independent of concentration. In axons, diffusion has been augmented by slow transport which moves cytoskeletal proteins and soluble enzymes at rates of approximately 1 μm/min. Little is known about the mechanisms of slow transport and although culture systems provide ready access to individual axons, the distances involved are often small enough that diffusion contributes a significant amount to the total supply of material. By using a larger isolated system that allows these competing transport effects to be separated we have been able to characterize them individually, and investigate their relative contributions along the axon.",
author = "James Galbraith",
year = "1999",
language = "English (US)",
isbn = "0780356756",
volume = "1",
pages = "401",
booktitle = "Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology - Proceedings",
publisher = "IEEE",

}

TY - GEN

T1 - Slow going - active and passive transport in axons

AU - Galbraith, James

PY - 1999

Y1 - 1999

N2 - Material can be moved throughout a cell in a variety of ways. The simplest manner is diffusion that relies upon a concentration gradient, but needs no external energy source. While efficient for short distances, this technique is not adequate for nerve cells where the axonal processes are quite long and material is synthesized only in the cell body. In this case an energy dependent system is used to actively supply material independent of concentration. In axons, diffusion has been augmented by slow transport which moves cytoskeletal proteins and soluble enzymes at rates of approximately 1 μm/min. Little is known about the mechanisms of slow transport and although culture systems provide ready access to individual axons, the distances involved are often small enough that diffusion contributes a significant amount to the total supply of material. By using a larger isolated system that allows these competing transport effects to be separated we have been able to characterize them individually, and investigate their relative contributions along the axon.

AB - Material can be moved throughout a cell in a variety of ways. The simplest manner is diffusion that relies upon a concentration gradient, but needs no external energy source. While efficient for short distances, this technique is not adequate for nerve cells where the axonal processes are quite long and material is synthesized only in the cell body. In this case an energy dependent system is used to actively supply material independent of concentration. In axons, diffusion has been augmented by slow transport which moves cytoskeletal proteins and soluble enzymes at rates of approximately 1 μm/min. Little is known about the mechanisms of slow transport and although culture systems provide ready access to individual axons, the distances involved are often small enough that diffusion contributes a significant amount to the total supply of material. By using a larger isolated system that allows these competing transport effects to be separated we have been able to characterize them individually, and investigate their relative contributions along the axon.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0033331109&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0033331109&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Conference contribution

AN - SCOPUS:0033331109

SN - 0780356756

VL - 1

SP - 401

BT - Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology - Proceedings

PB - IEEE

ER -