Sleep hygiene for children with neurodevelopmental disabilities

James E. Jan, Judith A. Owens, Margaret D. Weiss, Kyle Johnson, Michael B. Wasdell, Roger D. Freeman, Osman S. Ipsiroglu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

85 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Sleep disturbances in children with neurodevelopmental disabilities are common and have a profound effect on the quality of life of the child, as well as the entire family. Although interventions for sleep problems in these children often involve a combination of behavioral and pharmacologic strategies, the first line of treatment is the promotion of improved sleep habits or "hygiene." Despite the importance of sleep-hygiene principles, defined as basic optimal environmental, scheduling, sleep-practice, and physiologic sleep-promoting factors, clinicians often lack appropriate knowledge and skills to implement them. In addition, sleep-hygiene practices may need to be modified and adapted for this population of children and are often more challenging to implement compared with their healthy counterparts. This first comprehensive, multidisciplinary review of sleep hygiene for children with disabilities presents the rationale for incorporating these measures in their treatment, outlines both general and specific sleep-promotion practices, and discusses problem-solving strategies for implementing them in a variety of clinical practice settings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1343-1350
Number of pages8
JournalPediatrics
Volume122
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2008

Fingerprint

Disabled Children
Sleep
Hygiene
Habits
Sleep Hygiene
Quality of Life
Therapeutics
Population

Keywords

  • Burden of care
  • Children
  • Disabilities
  • Sleep disorders
  • Sleep hygiene

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Jan, J. E., Owens, J. A., Weiss, M. D., Johnson, K., Wasdell, M. B., Freeman, R. D., & Ipsiroglu, O. S. (2008). Sleep hygiene for children with neurodevelopmental disabilities. Pediatrics, 122(6), 1343-1350. https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2007-3308

Sleep hygiene for children with neurodevelopmental disabilities. / Jan, James E.; Owens, Judith A.; Weiss, Margaret D.; Johnson, Kyle; Wasdell, Michael B.; Freeman, Roger D.; Ipsiroglu, Osman S.

In: Pediatrics, Vol. 122, No. 6, 12.2008, p. 1343-1350.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Jan, JE, Owens, JA, Weiss, MD, Johnson, K, Wasdell, MB, Freeman, RD & Ipsiroglu, OS 2008, 'Sleep hygiene for children with neurodevelopmental disabilities', Pediatrics, vol. 122, no. 6, pp. 1343-1350. https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2007-3308
Jan JE, Owens JA, Weiss MD, Johnson K, Wasdell MB, Freeman RD et al. Sleep hygiene for children with neurodevelopmental disabilities. Pediatrics. 2008 Dec;122(6):1343-1350. https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2007-3308
Jan, James E. ; Owens, Judith A. ; Weiss, Margaret D. ; Johnson, Kyle ; Wasdell, Michael B. ; Freeman, Roger D. ; Ipsiroglu, Osman S. / Sleep hygiene for children with neurodevelopmental disabilities. In: Pediatrics. 2008 ; Vol. 122, No. 6. pp. 1343-1350.
@article{43bb425cd0594ae29e885476539c978a,
title = "Sleep hygiene for children with neurodevelopmental disabilities",
abstract = "Sleep disturbances in children with neurodevelopmental disabilities are common and have a profound effect on the quality of life of the child, as well as the entire family. Although interventions for sleep problems in these children often involve a combination of behavioral and pharmacologic strategies, the first line of treatment is the promotion of improved sleep habits or {"}hygiene.{"} Despite the importance of sleep-hygiene principles, defined as basic optimal environmental, scheduling, sleep-practice, and physiologic sleep-promoting factors, clinicians often lack appropriate knowledge and skills to implement them. In addition, sleep-hygiene practices may need to be modified and adapted for this population of children and are often more challenging to implement compared with their healthy counterparts. This first comprehensive, multidisciplinary review of sleep hygiene for children with disabilities presents the rationale for incorporating these measures in their treatment, outlines both general and specific sleep-promotion practices, and discusses problem-solving strategies for implementing them in a variety of clinical practice settings.",
keywords = "Burden of care, Children, Disabilities, Sleep disorders, Sleep hygiene",
author = "Jan, {James E.} and Owens, {Judith A.} and Weiss, {Margaret D.} and Kyle Johnson and Wasdell, {Michael B.} and Freeman, {Roger D.} and Ipsiroglu, {Osman S.}",
year = "2008",
month = "12",
doi = "10.1542/peds.2007-3308",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "122",
pages = "1343--1350",
journal = "Pediatrics",
issn = "0031-4005",
publisher = "American Academy of Pediatrics",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Sleep hygiene for children with neurodevelopmental disabilities

AU - Jan, James E.

AU - Owens, Judith A.

AU - Weiss, Margaret D.

AU - Johnson, Kyle

AU - Wasdell, Michael B.

AU - Freeman, Roger D.

AU - Ipsiroglu, Osman S.

PY - 2008/12

Y1 - 2008/12

N2 - Sleep disturbances in children with neurodevelopmental disabilities are common and have a profound effect on the quality of life of the child, as well as the entire family. Although interventions for sleep problems in these children often involve a combination of behavioral and pharmacologic strategies, the first line of treatment is the promotion of improved sleep habits or "hygiene." Despite the importance of sleep-hygiene principles, defined as basic optimal environmental, scheduling, sleep-practice, and physiologic sleep-promoting factors, clinicians often lack appropriate knowledge and skills to implement them. In addition, sleep-hygiene practices may need to be modified and adapted for this population of children and are often more challenging to implement compared with their healthy counterparts. This first comprehensive, multidisciplinary review of sleep hygiene for children with disabilities presents the rationale for incorporating these measures in their treatment, outlines both general and specific sleep-promotion practices, and discusses problem-solving strategies for implementing them in a variety of clinical practice settings.

AB - Sleep disturbances in children with neurodevelopmental disabilities are common and have a profound effect on the quality of life of the child, as well as the entire family. Although interventions for sleep problems in these children often involve a combination of behavioral and pharmacologic strategies, the first line of treatment is the promotion of improved sleep habits or "hygiene." Despite the importance of sleep-hygiene principles, defined as basic optimal environmental, scheduling, sleep-practice, and physiologic sleep-promoting factors, clinicians often lack appropriate knowledge and skills to implement them. In addition, sleep-hygiene practices may need to be modified and adapted for this population of children and are often more challenging to implement compared with their healthy counterparts. This first comprehensive, multidisciplinary review of sleep hygiene for children with disabilities presents the rationale for incorporating these measures in their treatment, outlines both general and specific sleep-promotion practices, and discusses problem-solving strategies for implementing them in a variety of clinical practice settings.

KW - Burden of care

KW - Children

KW - Disabilities

KW - Sleep disorders

KW - Sleep hygiene

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=58249087361&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=58249087361&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1542/peds.2007-3308

DO - 10.1542/peds.2007-3308

M3 - Article

C2 - 19047255

AN - SCOPUS:58249087361

VL - 122

SP - 1343

EP - 1350

JO - Pediatrics

JF - Pediatrics

SN - 0031-4005

IS - 6

ER -