Sleep health and predicted cardiometabolic risk scores in employed adults from two industries

Orfeu M. Buxton, Soomi Lee, Miguel Marino, Chloe Beverly, David M. Almeida, Lisa Berkman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Sleep disorders and sleep deficiency can increase the risk for cardiovascular disease. Less is known about whether multiple positive attributes of sleep health known as the SATED (satisfaction, alertness, timing, efficiency, and duration) model, can decrease future cardiovascular disease risks. We examined whether and how a variety of indicators of sleep health predicted 10-year estimated cardiometabolic risk scores (CRS) among employed adults. Methods: Workers in two industriesi extended care (n = 1,275) and information technology (IT; n = 577)reported on habitual sleep apnea symptoms and sleep sufficiency, and provided 1 week of actigraphy data including nighttime sleep duration, wake after sleep onset (WASO), sleep timing, and daytime napping. Workers also provided biomarkers to calculate future cardiometabolic risk. Results: More sleep apnea symptoms predicted higher CRS in both industries. More sleep sufficiency, less WASO, and less daytime napping (having no naps, fewer naps, and shorter nap duration) were also linked to lower CRS, but only in the extended care workers. There was no effect of sleep duration in both industries. In the IT employee sample, shorter sleep duration (≤6 hours versus 6C8 hours) and more naps strengthened the link between sleep apnea and CRS. Conclusions: Sleep health, measured by both subjective and objective methods, was associated with lower cardiometabolic disease risks among extended care workers (lower to middle wage workers). Sleep apnea was an important predictor of CRS; for the IT workers, the link between sleep apnea and CRS was exacerbated when they had poorer sleep health behaviors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)371-383
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Clinical Sleep Medicine
Volume14
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 15 2018

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Industry
Sleep
Health
Sleep Apnea Syndromes
Cardiovascular Diseases
Actigraphy
Salaries and Fringe Benefits
Health Behavior
Biomarkers
Technology

Keywords

  • Actigraphy
  • Cardiometabolic Risks
  • Employees
  • Sleep Apnea
  • Sleep Health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Sleep health and predicted cardiometabolic risk scores in employed adults from two industries. / Buxton, Orfeu M.; Lee, Soomi; Marino, Miguel; Beverly, Chloe; Almeida, David M.; Berkman, Lisa.

In: Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine, Vol. 14, No. 3, 15.03.2018, p. 371-383.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Buxton, Orfeu M. ; Lee, Soomi ; Marino, Miguel ; Beverly, Chloe ; Almeida, David M. ; Berkman, Lisa. / Sleep health and predicted cardiometabolic risk scores in employed adults from two industries. In: Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine. 2018 ; Vol. 14, No. 3. pp. 371-383.
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