Sleep disturbances in infants and young children following an acquired brain injury

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Study Objectives: Sleep disturbances impact over half of older children and teens with acquired brain injury (ABI) following critical care hospitalization but are underevaluated in infants and young children. Given the importance of sleep in brain development and healing after injury, we hypothesized sleep disturbances would be associated with worse neurodevelopmental outcomes in infants with ABI. Methods: We performed a retrospective cohort study of 68 children aged 2–32 months following critical care hospitalization for ABI. The Brief Infant Sleep Questionnaire assessed sleep disturbances. Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development, third edition and Adaptive Behavior Assessment System, third edition assessed developmental and adaptive functioning outcomes, respectively. t tests compared sleep characteristics in infants with ABI to historical healthy controls. Spearman’s correlation evaluated relationships among sleep and outcomes. Multiple linear regression investigated relationships controlling for demographic and ABI characteristics. Results: Compared to healthy controls, children with ABI had shorter nighttime sleep duration (P = .01), longer daytime sleep duration (P < .001), and longer duration of nighttime awakenings (P < .001). Duration of night awakenings negatively correlated with Bayley Cognitive scores (Spearman’s correlation = 2.40). Night awakenings negatively correlated with worse Adaptive Behavior Assessment System, third edition General Adaptive Composite scores (Spearman’s correlation = 2.42). When controlling for demographic and ABI characteristics, ≥ 3 awakenings was significantly associated with worse Adaptive Behavior Assessment System, third edition General Adaptive Composite (b = 211.3; 95% confidence interval = 219.2, 23.5). Conclusions: Sleep disturbances are associated with poorer outcomes in infants and toddlers after ABI. Sleep is vital to recovery and a potentially modifiable target to improve outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2387-2395
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Clinical Sleep Medicine
Volume18
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2022

Keywords

  • acquired brain injury
  • development
  • infant
  • sleep
  • toddler

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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