Sleep deprivation per se does not decrease the hypercapnic ventilatory response in humans

Christina M. Spengler, Steven A. Shea

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

48 Scopus citations

Abstract

Several studies have found that sleep deprivation reduces the hypercapnic ventilatory response (HCVR). Such results may have been affected by uncontrolled activities or environmental influences during the sleep deprivation period. The current study determined the 'pure' effect of sleep deprivation on respiratory control under strictly controlled behavioral and environmental conditions. After 2 d of acclimation in the laboratory, 10 subjects maintained wakefulness (confirmed by EEG), a constant semirecumbent posture, ate regular small meals, had constant interaction with experimenters, and stayed in an environment with constant low light (10 lux) and constant room temperature for 41 consecutive hours. Measurements of HCVR, resting ventilation, V̇O2 and V̇CO2 were performed eve 2 h. Comparisons were made of six pairs of measurements, with each pair separated by 24 h of sleep deprivation. None of the respiratory variables changed significantly with 24 h of sleep deprivation. Mean HCVR increased by 17% with sleep deprivation (3.12 versus 3.54 L · min-1 · mm Hg-1; not significant). These results show that sleep deprivation per se does not reduce the sensitivity of central chemoreceptors nor change resting ventilation or metabolism. The reduced HCVR after sleep loss found in previous studies may have been affected by uncontrolled activities or environmental influences during sleep deprivation periods.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1124-1128
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican journal of respiratory and critical care medicine
Volume161
Issue number4 I
DOIs
StatePublished - 2000

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Sleep deprivation per se does not decrease the hypercapnic ventilatory response in humans'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this