Similar clinical outcomes in African-American and non-African-American males treated with suramin for metastatic prostate cancer

Raymond C. Bergan, Ronald G. Walls, William D. Figg, Nancy A. Dawson, Donna Headlee, Anne Tompkins, Seth M. Steinberg, Eddie Reed

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

African-American males have a higher incidence of prostate cancer than non-African-American males and an overall poorer prognosis. Environmental factors such as socioeconomic status and biological factors such as an increased frequency of androgen receptor mutation have been identified as causal. As androgen ablation therapy is ubiquitous in the treatment of metastatic prostate cancer, little information is available on clinical outcome independent of hormone therapy. Our experience at the Warren G. Magnusson Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health with the anticancer agent, suramin, offers the opportunity to study clinical outcome in patients treated with an agent whose tumoricidal activity is not dependent on androgen receptor function. Clinical outcome was examined retrospectively in 43 patients treated on a single suramin-based protocol and evaluated as a function of ethnic background. No significant difference in time to disease progression or survival was observed between African Americans (n=4) and the other 39 patients. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that therapies that work through mechanisms independent of the androgen receptor may result in similar outcomes across ethnic groups.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)622-628
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of the National Medical Association
Volume89
Issue number9
StatePublished - Sep 1 1997

Keywords

  • African Americans
  • Clinical outcome
  • Ethnic groups
  • Prostate cancer
  • Suramin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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    Bergan, R. C., Walls, R. G., Figg, W. D., Dawson, N. A., Headlee, D., Tompkins, A., Steinberg, S. M., & Reed, E. (1997). Similar clinical outcomes in African-American and non-African-American males treated with suramin for metastatic prostate cancer. Journal of the National Medical Association, 89(9), 622-628.