Shared Decision Making in the Care of Children with Developmental and Behavioral Disorders

Ellen A. Lipstein, Olivia J. Lindly, Julia S. Anixt, Maria T. Britto, Katharine Zuckerman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective Shared decision making (SDM) is most needed when there are multiple treatment options and no “right” choice. As with quality and experience of care, frequency of SDM may vary by health condition. The objectives of this study were (1) to compare parent report of SDM between a physical and a behavioral health condition and; (2) to compare parent report of SDM between two different behavioral health conditions. Methods Data on children age 3–17 years with asthma, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and/or autism spectrum disorder (ASD) were drawn from the 2009/10 National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs. Weighted logistic regression was used to compare a parent-reported, composite measure of SDM. Analyses controlled for sociodemographic factors that may influence experience of SDM. Results Compared to parents of children with asthma, parents of children with ADHD were significantly less likely to report experiencing consistent SDM (AOR 0.73). Compared to parents of children with ADHD, those of children with ASD had significantly lower odds of experiencing consistent SDM (AOR 0.59). Those with both ADHD and ASD had the same odds as those with ASD alone of experiencing consistent SDM. Conclusion Use of SDM is particularly limited in developmental and behavioral conditions, such as ADHD and ASD. These data suggest that challenges to implementing SDM may include disease type, complexity, and use of specialty care. Research to identify specific barriers and facilitators of SDM is needed to inform interventions that will promote SDM in developmental and behavioral conditions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)665-673
Number of pages9
JournalMaternal and Child Health Journal
Volume20
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2016

Fingerprint

Child Care
Decision Making
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity
Parents
Health
Asthma
Quality of Health Care
Logistic Models
Autism Spectrum Disorder

Keywords

  • Asthma
  • Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder
  • Autism
  • Chronic conditions
  • Shared decision making

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Epidemiology
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Shared Decision Making in the Care of Children with Developmental and Behavioral Disorders. / Lipstein, Ellen A.; Lindly, Olivia J.; Anixt, Julia S.; Britto, Maria T.; Zuckerman, Katharine.

In: Maternal and Child Health Journal, Vol. 20, No. 3, 01.03.2016, p. 665-673.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lipstein, Ellen A. ; Lindly, Olivia J. ; Anixt, Julia S. ; Britto, Maria T. ; Zuckerman, Katharine. / Shared Decision Making in the Care of Children with Developmental and Behavioral Disorders. In: Maternal and Child Health Journal. 2016 ; Vol. 20, No. 3. pp. 665-673.
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