Sex-specific differences in the salivary microbiome of caries-active children

Stephanie Ortiz, Elisa Herrman, Claudia Lyashenko, Anne Purcell, Kareem Raslan, Brandon Khor, Michael Snow, Anna Forsyth, Dongseok Choi, Tom Maier, Curtis Machida

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background and Objectives: Dental caries is a chronic disease affecting young children and has multi-factorial risk factors. The purpose of this work was to identify sex-specific differences in the salivary microbiota within caries-active children. Design: Saliva specimens were collected from 85 children (boys: 41; girls: 44) between the ages of 2-12 years. Salivary microbial DNA was subjected to PCR amplification using V3-V4 16S rDNA-specific primers and next-generation sequencing. Results: Significant sex differences in salivary microbiota were found between caries-active boys versus caries-active girls. Neisseria flavescens, Rothia aeria, and Haemophilus pittmaniae were found at significantly higher levels in caries-active boys. In contrast, Lactococcus lactis, Selenomonas species HOT 126, Actinobaculum species HOT 183, Veillonella parvula, and Alloprevotella species HOT 473 were found at significantly higher levels in caries-active girls. Conclusion: We have found the acid-generating, cariogenic Lactococcus lactis to be much more abundant in caries-active girls than caries-active boys, indicating that this microorganism may play a more significant role in shaping the cariogenic microbiome in girls. In addition, in caries-active girls, Alloprevotella species HOT 473 was the only species that exhibited both significant sex differences (4.4-fold difference; p=0.0003) as well as high abundance in numbers (1.85% of the total microbial population).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number1653124
JournalJournal of Oral Microbiology
Volume11
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Microbiota
Sex Characteristics
Lactococcus lactis
Selenomonas
Veillonella
Haemophilus
Neisseria
Dental Caries
Ribosomal DNA
Saliva
Chronic Disease
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Acids
DNA
Population

Keywords

  • children
  • dental caries
  • oral microbiome
  • Salivary microbiome
  • sex differences

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dentistry (miscellaneous)
  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Sex-specific differences in the salivary microbiome of caries-active children. / Ortiz, Stephanie; Herrman, Elisa; Lyashenko, Claudia; Purcell, Anne; Raslan, Kareem; Khor, Brandon; Snow, Michael; Forsyth, Anna; Choi, Dongseok; Maier, Tom; Machida, Curtis.

In: Journal of Oral Microbiology, Vol. 11, No. 1, 1653124, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ortiz, S, Herrman, E, Lyashenko, C, Purcell, A, Raslan, K, Khor, B, Snow, M, Forsyth, A, Choi, D, Maier, T & Machida, C 2019, 'Sex-specific differences in the salivary microbiome of caries-active children', Journal of Oral Microbiology, vol. 11, no. 1, 1653124. https://doi.org/10.1080/20002297.2019.1653124
Ortiz, Stephanie ; Herrman, Elisa ; Lyashenko, Claudia ; Purcell, Anne ; Raslan, Kareem ; Khor, Brandon ; Snow, Michael ; Forsyth, Anna ; Choi, Dongseok ; Maier, Tom ; Machida, Curtis. / Sex-specific differences in the salivary microbiome of caries-active children. In: Journal of Oral Microbiology. 2019 ; Vol. 11, No. 1.
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AU - Khor, Brandon

AU - Snow, Michael

AU - Forsyth, Anna

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AB - Background and Objectives: Dental caries is a chronic disease affecting young children and has multi-factorial risk factors. The purpose of this work was to identify sex-specific differences in the salivary microbiota within caries-active children. Design: Saliva specimens were collected from 85 children (boys: 41; girls: 44) between the ages of 2-12 years. Salivary microbial DNA was subjected to PCR amplification using V3-V4 16S rDNA-specific primers and next-generation sequencing. Results: Significant sex differences in salivary microbiota were found between caries-active boys versus caries-active girls. Neisseria flavescens, Rothia aeria, and Haemophilus pittmaniae were found at significantly higher levels in caries-active boys. In contrast, Lactococcus lactis, Selenomonas species HOT 126, Actinobaculum species HOT 183, Veillonella parvula, and Alloprevotella species HOT 473 were found at significantly higher levels in caries-active girls. Conclusion: We have found the acid-generating, cariogenic Lactococcus lactis to be much more abundant in caries-active girls than caries-active boys, indicating that this microorganism may play a more significant role in shaping the cariogenic microbiome in girls. In addition, in caries-active girls, Alloprevotella species HOT 473 was the only species that exhibited both significant sex differences (4.4-fold difference; p=0.0003) as well as high abundance in numbers (1.85% of the total microbial population).

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