Sex differences in the response of rat heart ventricle to calcium.

Dorie W. Schwertz, Jenny M. Beck, Jill M. Kowalski, James Ross

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Calcium (Ca2+) is a key mediator of myocardial function. Calcium regulates contraction, and disruption of myocellular Ca2+ handling plays a role in cardiac pathologies such as arrhythmias and heart failure. This investigation examines sex differences in sensitivity of the contractile proteins to Ca2+ and myofibrillar Ca2+ delivery in the ventricular myocardium. Sensitivity of contractile proteins to Ca2+ was measured in weight-matched male and female Sprague-Dawley rats using the skinned ventricular papillary muscle fiber and Ca(2+)-stimulated Mg(2+)-dependent adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) activity methodologies. Calcium delivery was examined by measuring the contractile response to a range of extracellular Ca2+ concentrations in isolated ventricular myocytes, papillary muscle, and the isolated perfused whole heart. Findings from studies in the whole heart suggest that at a fixed preload, the male left ventricle generates more pressure than a female ventricle over a range of extracellular Ca2+ concentrations. In contrast, results from myocyte and papillary muscle studies suggest that females require less extracellular Ca2+ to elicit a similar contractile response. Results obtained from the 2 methods used to determine sex differences in Ca2+ sensitivity were equivocal. Further studies are required to elucidate sex differences in myocardial Ca2+ handling and the reasons for disparate results in different heart muscle preparations. The results of these studies will lead to the design of sex-optimized therapeutic interventions for cardiac disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)286-298
Number of pages13
JournalBiological Research for Nursing
Volume5
Issue number4
StatePublished - Apr 2004
Externally publishedYes

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Papillary Muscles
Sex Characteristics
Heart Ventricles
Contractile Proteins
Calcium
Muscle Cells
Myocardium
Sprague Dawley Rats
Adenosine Triphosphatases
Cardiac Arrhythmias
Heart Diseases
Heart Failure
Pathology
Pressure
Weights and Measures
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Research and Theory

Cite this

Sex differences in the response of rat heart ventricle to calcium. / Schwertz, Dorie W.; Beck, Jenny M.; Kowalski, Jill M.; Ross, James.

In: Biological Research for Nursing, Vol. 5, No. 4, 04.2004, p. 286-298.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Schwertz, DW, Beck, JM, Kowalski, JM & Ross, J 2004, 'Sex differences in the response of rat heart ventricle to calcium.', Biological Research for Nursing, vol. 5, no. 4, pp. 286-298.
Schwertz, Dorie W. ; Beck, Jenny M. ; Kowalski, Jill M. ; Ross, James. / Sex differences in the response of rat heart ventricle to calcium. In: Biological Research for Nursing. 2004 ; Vol. 5, No. 4. pp. 286-298.
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