Severe Eye Injuries in the War in Iraq, 2003-2005

Allen B. Thach, Anthony J. Johnson, Robert B. Carroll, Ava Huchun, Darryl J. Ainbinder, Richard Stutzman, Sean M. Blaydon, Sheri L. DeMartelaere, Thomas H. Mader, Clifton S. Slade, Roger K. George, John P. Ritchey, Scott D. Barnes, Lilia A. Fannin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

67 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: To document the incidence and treatment of patients with severe ocular and ocular adnexal injuries during Operation Iraqi Freedom. Design: Retrospective hospital-based observational analysis of injuries. Participants: All coalition forces, enemy prisoners of war, and civilians with severe ocular and ocular adnexal injuries. Methods: The authors retrospectively examined severe ocular and ocular adnexal injuries that were treated by United States Army ophthalmologists during the war in Iraq from March 2003 through December 2005. Main Outcome Measures: Incidence, causes, and treatment of severe ocular and ocular adnexal injuries. Results: During the time data were gathered, 797 severe eye injuries were treated. The most common cause of the eye injuries was explosions with fragmentation injury. Among those injured, there were 438 open globe injuries, of which 49 were bilateral. A total of 116 eyes were removed (enucleation, evisceration, or exenteration), of which 6 patients required bilateral enucleation. Injuries to other body systems were common. Conclusions: Severe eye injuries represent a significant form of trauma encountered in Operation Iraqi Freedom. These injuries were most commonly caused by explosion trauma.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)377-382
Number of pages6
JournalOphthalmology
Volume115
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2008
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Eye Injuries
Iraq
2003-2011 Iraq War
Wounds and Injuries
Explosions
Prisoners of War
Hospital Design and Construction
Incidence
Warfare
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Ophthalmology

Cite this

Thach, A. B., Johnson, A. J., Carroll, R. B., Huchun, A., Ainbinder, D. J., Stutzman, R., ... Fannin, L. A. (2008). Severe Eye Injuries in the War in Iraq, 2003-2005. Ophthalmology, 115(2), 377-382. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ophtha.2007.04.032

Severe Eye Injuries in the War in Iraq, 2003-2005. / Thach, Allen B.; Johnson, Anthony J.; Carroll, Robert B.; Huchun, Ava; Ainbinder, Darryl J.; Stutzman, Richard; Blaydon, Sean M.; DeMartelaere, Sheri L.; Mader, Thomas H.; Slade, Clifton S.; George, Roger K.; Ritchey, John P.; Barnes, Scott D.; Fannin, Lilia A.

In: Ophthalmology, Vol. 115, No. 2, 01.02.2008, p. 377-382.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Thach, AB, Johnson, AJ, Carroll, RB, Huchun, A, Ainbinder, DJ, Stutzman, R, Blaydon, SM, DeMartelaere, SL, Mader, TH, Slade, CS, George, RK, Ritchey, JP, Barnes, SD & Fannin, LA 2008, 'Severe Eye Injuries in the War in Iraq, 2003-2005', Ophthalmology, vol. 115, no. 2, pp. 377-382. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ophtha.2007.04.032
Thach AB, Johnson AJ, Carroll RB, Huchun A, Ainbinder DJ, Stutzman R et al. Severe Eye Injuries in the War in Iraq, 2003-2005. Ophthalmology. 2008 Feb 1;115(2):377-382. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ophtha.2007.04.032
Thach, Allen B. ; Johnson, Anthony J. ; Carroll, Robert B. ; Huchun, Ava ; Ainbinder, Darryl J. ; Stutzman, Richard ; Blaydon, Sean M. ; DeMartelaere, Sheri L. ; Mader, Thomas H. ; Slade, Clifton S. ; George, Roger K. ; Ritchey, John P. ; Barnes, Scott D. ; Fannin, Lilia A. / Severe Eye Injuries in the War in Iraq, 2003-2005. In: Ophthalmology. 2008 ; Vol. 115, No. 2. pp. 377-382.
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