Severe aortic stenosis in patients 60 years of age or older

left ventricular function and 10-year survival after valve replacement.

Edward Murphy, R. M. Lawson, Albert Starr, S. H. Rahimtoola

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

75 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

From 1962-1977, 99 patients, mean age 65 +/- 0.5 years (range 60-81 years) underwent valve replacement for severe calcific aortic valve stenosis. Ninety-three percent of the patients were in New York Heart Association functional class III or IV. The aortic valve gradient was 76 +/- 3 mm Hg and the aortic valve area index was 0.34 +/- 0.01 cm2/m2. Left ventricular systolic pressure was 207 +/- 4 mm Hg, cardiac index was 2.5 +/- 0.1 l/min/m2, left ventricular ejection fraction was 0.57 +/- 0.02 and left ventricular end-diastolic volume index was 108 +/- 60 ml/m2; left ventricular ejection fraction and end-diastolic volume were normal in 63% of the patients. The operative mortality was 16%. Mean follow-up is 55 +/- 4 months. Using life-table analysis, the 10-year survival, excluding cardiac deaths, is 57.5 +/- 7%. Ninety-one percent of the survivors are in functional class I or II. We conclude that the left ventricular function is normal in two-thirds of elderly patients with severe aortic valve stenosis. After valve replacement, the 10-year survival is most encouraging and most of the survivors are functionally improved.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalCirculation
Volume64
Issue number2 Pt 2
StatePublished - Aug 1981
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Aortic Valve Stenosis
Left Ventricular Function
Stroke Volume
Survival
Aortic Valve
Survivors
Life Tables
Ventricular Pressure
Blood Pressure
Mortality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Severe aortic stenosis in patients 60 years of age or older : left ventricular function and 10-year survival after valve replacement. / Murphy, Edward; Lawson, R. M.; Starr, Albert; Rahimtoola, S. H.

In: Circulation, Vol. 64, No. 2 Pt 2, 08.1981.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{6feabf4954014b1f86d7cb04bf6f8d0b,
title = "Severe aortic stenosis in patients 60 years of age or older: left ventricular function and 10-year survival after valve replacement.",
abstract = "From 1962-1977, 99 patients, mean age 65 +/- 0.5 years (range 60-81 years) underwent valve replacement for severe calcific aortic valve stenosis. Ninety-three percent of the patients were in New York Heart Association functional class III or IV. The aortic valve gradient was 76 +/- 3 mm Hg and the aortic valve area index was 0.34 +/- 0.01 cm2/m2. Left ventricular systolic pressure was 207 +/- 4 mm Hg, cardiac index was 2.5 +/- 0.1 l/min/m2, left ventricular ejection fraction was 0.57 +/- 0.02 and left ventricular end-diastolic volume index was 108 +/- 60 ml/m2; left ventricular ejection fraction and end-diastolic volume were normal in 63{\%} of the patients. The operative mortality was 16{\%}. Mean follow-up is 55 +/- 4 months. Using life-table analysis, the 10-year survival, excluding cardiac deaths, is 57.5 +/- 7{\%}. Ninety-one percent of the survivors are in functional class I or II. We conclude that the left ventricular function is normal in two-thirds of elderly patients with severe aortic valve stenosis. After valve replacement, the 10-year survival is most encouraging and most of the survivors are functionally improved.",
author = "Edward Murphy and Lawson, {R. M.} and Albert Starr and Rahimtoola, {S. H.}",
year = "1981",
month = "8",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "64",
journal = "Circulation",
issn = "0009-7322",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "2 Pt 2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Severe aortic stenosis in patients 60 years of age or older

T2 - left ventricular function and 10-year survival after valve replacement.

AU - Murphy, Edward

AU - Lawson, R. M.

AU - Starr, Albert

AU - Rahimtoola, S. H.

PY - 1981/8

Y1 - 1981/8

N2 - From 1962-1977, 99 patients, mean age 65 +/- 0.5 years (range 60-81 years) underwent valve replacement for severe calcific aortic valve stenosis. Ninety-three percent of the patients were in New York Heart Association functional class III or IV. The aortic valve gradient was 76 +/- 3 mm Hg and the aortic valve area index was 0.34 +/- 0.01 cm2/m2. Left ventricular systolic pressure was 207 +/- 4 mm Hg, cardiac index was 2.5 +/- 0.1 l/min/m2, left ventricular ejection fraction was 0.57 +/- 0.02 and left ventricular end-diastolic volume index was 108 +/- 60 ml/m2; left ventricular ejection fraction and end-diastolic volume were normal in 63% of the patients. The operative mortality was 16%. Mean follow-up is 55 +/- 4 months. Using life-table analysis, the 10-year survival, excluding cardiac deaths, is 57.5 +/- 7%. Ninety-one percent of the survivors are in functional class I or II. We conclude that the left ventricular function is normal in two-thirds of elderly patients with severe aortic valve stenosis. After valve replacement, the 10-year survival is most encouraging and most of the survivors are functionally improved.

AB - From 1962-1977, 99 patients, mean age 65 +/- 0.5 years (range 60-81 years) underwent valve replacement for severe calcific aortic valve stenosis. Ninety-three percent of the patients were in New York Heart Association functional class III or IV. The aortic valve gradient was 76 +/- 3 mm Hg and the aortic valve area index was 0.34 +/- 0.01 cm2/m2. Left ventricular systolic pressure was 207 +/- 4 mm Hg, cardiac index was 2.5 +/- 0.1 l/min/m2, left ventricular ejection fraction was 0.57 +/- 0.02 and left ventricular end-diastolic volume index was 108 +/- 60 ml/m2; left ventricular ejection fraction and end-diastolic volume were normal in 63% of the patients. The operative mortality was 16%. Mean follow-up is 55 +/- 4 months. Using life-table analysis, the 10-year survival, excluding cardiac deaths, is 57.5 +/- 7%. Ninety-one percent of the survivors are in functional class I or II. We conclude that the left ventricular function is normal in two-thirds of elderly patients with severe aortic valve stenosis. After valve replacement, the 10-year survival is most encouraging and most of the survivors are functionally improved.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0019606595&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0019606595&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 64

JO - Circulation

JF - Circulation

SN - 0009-7322

IS - 2 Pt 2

ER -