Serum lutein concentrations in healthy term infants fed human milk or infant formula with lutein

Jodi Bettler, J. Paul Zimmer, Martha Neuringer, Patricia A. Derusso

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    57 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Background: Lutein is a carotenoid that may play a role in eye health. Human milk typically contains higher concentrations of lutein than infant formula. Preliminary data suggest there are differences in serum lutein concentrations between breastfed and formula-fed infants. Aim of the study: To measure the serum lutein concentrations among infants fed human milk or formulas with and without added lutein. Methods: A prospective, double-masked trial was conducted in healthy term formula-fed infants (n = 26) randomized between 9 and 16 days of age to study formulas containing 20 (unfortified), 45, 120, and 225 mcg/l of lutein. A breastfed reference group was studied (n = 14) and milk samples were collected from their mothers. Primary outcome was serum lutein concentration at week 12. Results: Geometric mean lutein concentration of human milk was 21.1 mcg/l (95% CI 14.9-30.0). At week 12, the human milk group had a sixfold higher geometric mean serum lutein (69.3 mcg/l; 95% CI 40.3-119) than the unfortified formula group (11.3 mcg/l; 95% CI 8.1-15.8). Mean serum lutein increased from baseline in each formula group except the unfortified group. Linear regression equation indicated breastfed infants had a greater increase in serum lutein (slope 3.7; P <0.001) per unit increase in milk lutein than formula-fed infants (slope 0.9; P <0.001). Conclusions: Breastfed infants have higher mean serum lutein concentrations than infants who consume formula unfortified with lutein. These data suggest approximately 4 times more lutein is needed in infant formula than in human milk to achieve similar serum lutein concentrations among breastfed and formula fed infants.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)45-51
    Number of pages7
    JournalEuropean Journal of Nutrition
    Volume49
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Feb 2010

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    Lutein
    Infant Formula
    Human Milk
    Serum
    Milk
    Carotenoids

    Keywords

    • Bioavailability
    • Human milk
    • Infant formula
    • Lutein
    • Serum

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Medicine (miscellaneous)
    • Nutrition and Dietetics

    Cite this

    Serum lutein concentrations in healthy term infants fed human milk or infant formula with lutein. / Bettler, Jodi; Zimmer, J. Paul; Neuringer, Martha; Derusso, Patricia A.

    In: European Journal of Nutrition, Vol. 49, No. 1, 02.2010, p. 45-51.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Bettler, Jodi ; Zimmer, J. Paul ; Neuringer, Martha ; Derusso, Patricia A. / Serum lutein concentrations in healthy term infants fed human milk or infant formula with lutein. In: European Journal of Nutrition. 2010 ; Vol. 49, No. 1. pp. 45-51.
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    abstract = "Background: Lutein is a carotenoid that may play a role in eye health. Human milk typically contains higher concentrations of lutein than infant formula. Preliminary data suggest there are differences in serum lutein concentrations between breastfed and formula-fed infants. Aim of the study: To measure the serum lutein concentrations among infants fed human milk or formulas with and without added lutein. Methods: A prospective, double-masked trial was conducted in healthy term formula-fed infants (n = 26) randomized between 9 and 16 days of age to study formulas containing 20 (unfortified), 45, 120, and 225 mcg/l of lutein. A breastfed reference group was studied (n = 14) and milk samples were collected from their mothers. Primary outcome was serum lutein concentration at week 12. Results: Geometric mean lutein concentration of human milk was 21.1 mcg/l (95{\%} CI 14.9-30.0). At week 12, the human milk group had a sixfold higher geometric mean serum lutein (69.3 mcg/l; 95{\%} CI 40.3-119) than the unfortified formula group (11.3 mcg/l; 95{\%} CI 8.1-15.8). Mean serum lutein increased from baseline in each formula group except the unfortified group. Linear regression equation indicated breastfed infants had a greater increase in serum lutein (slope 3.7; P <0.001) per unit increase in milk lutein than formula-fed infants (slope 0.9; P <0.001). Conclusions: Breastfed infants have higher mean serum lutein concentrations than infants who consume formula unfortified with lutein. These data suggest approximately 4 times more lutein is needed in infant formula than in human milk to achieve similar serum lutein concentrations among breastfed and formula fed infants.",
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    T1 - Serum lutein concentrations in healthy term infants fed human milk or infant formula with lutein

    AU - Bettler, Jodi

    AU - Zimmer, J. Paul

    AU - Neuringer, Martha

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    N2 - Background: Lutein is a carotenoid that may play a role in eye health. Human milk typically contains higher concentrations of lutein than infant formula. Preliminary data suggest there are differences in serum lutein concentrations between breastfed and formula-fed infants. Aim of the study: To measure the serum lutein concentrations among infants fed human milk or formulas with and without added lutein. Methods: A prospective, double-masked trial was conducted in healthy term formula-fed infants (n = 26) randomized between 9 and 16 days of age to study formulas containing 20 (unfortified), 45, 120, and 225 mcg/l of lutein. A breastfed reference group was studied (n = 14) and milk samples were collected from their mothers. Primary outcome was serum lutein concentration at week 12. Results: Geometric mean lutein concentration of human milk was 21.1 mcg/l (95% CI 14.9-30.0). At week 12, the human milk group had a sixfold higher geometric mean serum lutein (69.3 mcg/l; 95% CI 40.3-119) than the unfortified formula group (11.3 mcg/l; 95% CI 8.1-15.8). Mean serum lutein increased from baseline in each formula group except the unfortified group. Linear regression equation indicated breastfed infants had a greater increase in serum lutein (slope 3.7; P <0.001) per unit increase in milk lutein than formula-fed infants (slope 0.9; P <0.001). Conclusions: Breastfed infants have higher mean serum lutein concentrations than infants who consume formula unfortified with lutein. These data suggest approximately 4 times more lutein is needed in infant formula than in human milk to achieve similar serum lutein concentrations among breastfed and formula fed infants.

    AB - Background: Lutein is a carotenoid that may play a role in eye health. Human milk typically contains higher concentrations of lutein than infant formula. Preliminary data suggest there are differences in serum lutein concentrations between breastfed and formula-fed infants. Aim of the study: To measure the serum lutein concentrations among infants fed human milk or formulas with and without added lutein. Methods: A prospective, double-masked trial was conducted in healthy term formula-fed infants (n = 26) randomized between 9 and 16 days of age to study formulas containing 20 (unfortified), 45, 120, and 225 mcg/l of lutein. A breastfed reference group was studied (n = 14) and milk samples were collected from their mothers. Primary outcome was serum lutein concentration at week 12. Results: Geometric mean lutein concentration of human milk was 21.1 mcg/l (95% CI 14.9-30.0). At week 12, the human milk group had a sixfold higher geometric mean serum lutein (69.3 mcg/l; 95% CI 40.3-119) than the unfortified formula group (11.3 mcg/l; 95% CI 8.1-15.8). Mean serum lutein increased from baseline in each formula group except the unfortified group. Linear regression equation indicated breastfed infants had a greater increase in serum lutein (slope 3.7; P <0.001) per unit increase in milk lutein than formula-fed infants (slope 0.9; P <0.001). Conclusions: Breastfed infants have higher mean serum lutein concentrations than infants who consume formula unfortified with lutein. These data suggest approximately 4 times more lutein is needed in infant formula than in human milk to achieve similar serum lutein concentrations among breastfed and formula fed infants.

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