Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D, parathyroid hormone, and mortality in older men

Peggy M. Cawthon, Neeta Parimi, Elizabeth Barrett-Connor, Gail A. Laughlin, Kristine E. Ensrud, Andrew R. Hoffman, James M. Shikany, Jane A. Cauley, Nancy E. Lane, Douglas C. Bauer, Eric Orwoll, Steven R. Cummings

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Context: Low 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] and high PTH may contribute to increased mortality risk in older adults. Objective: The aim of the study was to test the association between 25(OH)D, PTH, and mortality in older men. Design and Setting: The prospective Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) study was conducted at six U.S. clinical centers. Participants: We studied community-dwelling men at least 65 yr old (n = 1490). Main Outcome Measure: Multivariate-adjusted proportional hazards models estimated the hazard ratio (HR) for mortality; cause of death was classified as cancer, cardiovascular, and other by central review of death certificates. Results: During 7.3 yr of follow-up, 330 (22.2%) participants died: 97 from cancer, 110 from cardiovascular disease, and 106 from other causes. The adjusted HR per SD decrease in 25(OH)D for all-cause mortality was 1.01 (95% CI, 0.89, 1.14); no association between 25(OH)D and cardiovascular or other-cause mortality was seen. Unexpectedly, lower 25(OH)D levels were modestly associated with a decreased risk of cancer mortality (adjusted HR per SD decrease, 0.80; 95% CI, 0.64, 0.99). Analyzing 25(OH)D as a categorical variable did not alter these results. Higher PTH levels (log-transformed) were associated with an increased risk of all-cause mortality (adjusted HR per SD increase, 1.15; 95% CI, 1.03, 1.29) and cardiovascular mortality (adjusted HR per SD increase in PTH, 1.21; 95% CI, 1.00, 1.45). Conclusions: In contrast to previous studies, lower 25(OH)D levels were not associated with an increased risk of all-cause or cause-specific mortality in older men. Higher PTH levels were associated with a modest increase in mortality risk.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)4625-4634
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism
Volume95
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2010

Fingerprint

Parathyroid Hormone
Hazards
Mortality
Serum
25-hydroxyvitamin D
Independent Living
Neoplasms
Osteoporotic Fractures
Death Certificates
Proportional Hazards Models
Cause of Death
Cardiovascular Diseases
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Endocrinology
  • Biochemistry, medical
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Cawthon, P. M., Parimi, N., Barrett-Connor, E., Laughlin, G. A., Ensrud, K. E., Hoffman, A. R., ... Cummings, S. R. (2010). Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D, parathyroid hormone, and mortality in older men. Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, 95(10), 4625-4634. https://doi.org/10.1210/jc.2010-0638

Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D, parathyroid hormone, and mortality in older men. / Cawthon, Peggy M.; Parimi, Neeta; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth; Laughlin, Gail A.; Ensrud, Kristine E.; Hoffman, Andrew R.; Shikany, James M.; Cauley, Jane A.; Lane, Nancy E.; Bauer, Douglas C.; Orwoll, Eric; Cummings, Steven R.

In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, Vol. 95, No. 10, 10.2010, p. 4625-4634.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cawthon, PM, Parimi, N, Barrett-Connor, E, Laughlin, GA, Ensrud, KE, Hoffman, AR, Shikany, JM, Cauley, JA, Lane, NE, Bauer, DC, Orwoll, E & Cummings, SR 2010, 'Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D, parathyroid hormone, and mortality in older men', Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, vol. 95, no. 10, pp. 4625-4634. https://doi.org/10.1210/jc.2010-0638
Cawthon PM, Parimi N, Barrett-Connor E, Laughlin GA, Ensrud KE, Hoffman AR et al. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D, parathyroid hormone, and mortality in older men. Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism. 2010 Oct;95(10):4625-4634. https://doi.org/10.1210/jc.2010-0638
Cawthon, Peggy M. ; Parimi, Neeta ; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth ; Laughlin, Gail A. ; Ensrud, Kristine E. ; Hoffman, Andrew R. ; Shikany, James M. ; Cauley, Jane A. ; Lane, Nancy E. ; Bauer, Douglas C. ; Orwoll, Eric ; Cummings, Steven R. / Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D, parathyroid hormone, and mortality in older men. In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism. 2010 ; Vol. 95, No. 10. pp. 4625-4634.
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abstract = "Context: Low 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] and high PTH may contribute to increased mortality risk in older adults. Objective: The aim of the study was to test the association between 25(OH)D, PTH, and mortality in older men. Design and Setting: The prospective Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) study was conducted at six U.S. clinical centers. Participants: We studied community-dwelling men at least 65 yr old (n = 1490). Main Outcome Measure: Multivariate-adjusted proportional hazards models estimated the hazard ratio (HR) for mortality; cause of death was classified as cancer, cardiovascular, and other by central review of death certificates. Results: During 7.3 yr of follow-up, 330 (22.2{\%}) participants died: 97 from cancer, 110 from cardiovascular disease, and 106 from other causes. The adjusted HR per SD decrease in 25(OH)D for all-cause mortality was 1.01 (95{\%} CI, 0.89, 1.14); no association between 25(OH)D and cardiovascular or other-cause mortality was seen. Unexpectedly, lower 25(OH)D levels were modestly associated with a decreased risk of cancer mortality (adjusted HR per SD decrease, 0.80; 95{\%} CI, 0.64, 0.99). Analyzing 25(OH)D as a categorical variable did not alter these results. Higher PTH levels (log-transformed) were associated with an increased risk of all-cause mortality (adjusted HR per SD increase, 1.15; 95{\%} CI, 1.03, 1.29) and cardiovascular mortality (adjusted HR per SD increase in PTH, 1.21; 95{\%} CI, 1.00, 1.45). Conclusions: In contrast to previous studies, lower 25(OH)D levels were not associated with an increased risk of all-cause or cause-specific mortality in older men. Higher PTH levels were associated with a modest increase in mortality risk.",
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AU - Ensrud, Kristine E.

AU - Hoffman, Andrew R.

AU - Shikany, James M.

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