Serous tubal intraepithelial carcinoma or not? Metastases to fallopian tube mucosa can masquerade as in situ lesions

Reena Singh, Kathleen R. Cho

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Context. - Nonuterine high-grade serous carcinomas (HGSCs) are believed to arise most often from precursors in the fallopian tube referred to as serous tubal intraepithelial carcinomas (STICs). A designation of tubal origin has been suggested for all cases of nonuterine HGSC if a STIC is identified. Objective. - To highlight that many different types of nongynecologic and gynecologic carcinomas, including HGSC, can metastasize to the tubal mucosa and mimic de novo STIC. Data Sources. - A mini-review of several recently published studies that collectively examine STIC-like lesions of the fallopian tube. Conclusions. - The fallopian tube mucosa can be a site of metastasis from carcinomas arising elsewhere, and pathologists should exercise caution in diagnosing STIC without first considering the possibility of metastasis. Routinely used immunohistochemical stains can often be used to determine if a STIC-like lesion is tubal or nongynecologic in origin. In the context of uterine and nonuterine HGSC, STIC may represent a metastasis rather than the site of origin, particularly when widespread disease is present.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1313-1315
Number of pages3
JournalArchives of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine
Volume141
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2017
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Medical Laboratory Technology

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