Self-reported hypertension prevalence and income among older adults in Canada and the United States

Mark S. Kaplan, Nathalie Huguet, David H. Feeny, Bentson McFarland

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

41 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Hypertension is one of the most common chronic conditions worldwide. There is strong evidence that low socioeconomic status is associated with elevated rates of blood pressure-related cardiovascular disease. Few studies have examined the association between socioeconomic circumstances and hypertension among people aged 65 years and older. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between household income and self-reported hypertension prevalence among persons aged 65 and older in the United States and Canada. Data were obtained from the 2002-2003 Joint Canada/United States Survey of Health for 755 Canadian and 1151 US adults aged 65 and older. Aggregate hypertension prevalence rates in the United States and Canada were generally similar (53.8% versus 48.0%). We found a significant inverse linear relationship between household income and the hypertension prevalence rate in the United States, but no evidence of such a relationship in Canada. In Canada, unlike the United States, the burden of hypertension is approximately equal for socioeconomically advantaged and disadvantaged older adults. It is important to consider these findings in the context of long-term and broader institutional policies. Social disparities and barriers to health care access and primary prevention among non-elderly persons in the United States may play a role in the higher hypertension prevalence rate among low-income older adults.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)844-849
Number of pages6
JournalSocial Science and Medicine
Volume70
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2010

Fingerprint

hypertension
Canada
Hypertension
income
household income
Organizational Policy
Health Services Accessibility
human being
Vulnerable Populations
Primary Prevention
Income
Health Surveys
Social Class
evidence
social status
Cardiovascular Diseases
low income
Joints
health care
Blood Pressure

Keywords

  • Aging
  • Canada
  • Health inequalities
  • Hypertension
  • Income
  • Older people
  • USA

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Self-reported hypertension prevalence and income among older adults in Canada and the United States. / Kaplan, Mark S.; Huguet, Nathalie; Feeny, David H.; McFarland, Bentson.

In: Social Science and Medicine, Vol. 70, No. 6, 03.2010, p. 844-849.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kaplan, Mark S. ; Huguet, Nathalie ; Feeny, David H. ; McFarland, Bentson. / Self-reported hypertension prevalence and income among older adults in Canada and the United States. In: Social Science and Medicine. 2010 ; Vol. 70, No. 6. pp. 844-849.
@article{fe8e95d0c07b47d4ac1085400d59b93c,
title = "Self-reported hypertension prevalence and income among older adults in Canada and the United States",
abstract = "Hypertension is one of the most common chronic conditions worldwide. There is strong evidence that low socioeconomic status is associated with elevated rates of blood pressure-related cardiovascular disease. Few studies have examined the association between socioeconomic circumstances and hypertension among people aged 65 years and older. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between household income and self-reported hypertension prevalence among persons aged 65 and older in the United States and Canada. Data were obtained from the 2002-2003 Joint Canada/United States Survey of Health for 755 Canadian and 1151 US adults aged 65 and older. Aggregate hypertension prevalence rates in the United States and Canada were generally similar (53.8{\%} versus 48.0{\%}). We found a significant inverse linear relationship between household income and the hypertension prevalence rate in the United States, but no evidence of such a relationship in Canada. In Canada, unlike the United States, the burden of hypertension is approximately equal for socioeconomically advantaged and disadvantaged older adults. It is important to consider these findings in the context of long-term and broader institutional policies. Social disparities and barriers to health care access and primary prevention among non-elderly persons in the United States may play a role in the higher hypertension prevalence rate among low-income older adults.",
keywords = "Aging, Canada, Health inequalities, Hypertension, Income, Older people, USA",
author = "Kaplan, {Mark S.} and Nathalie Huguet and Feeny, {David H.} and Bentson McFarland",
year = "2010",
month = "3",
doi = "10.1016/j.socscimed.2009.11.019",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "70",
pages = "844--849",
journal = "Social Science and Medicine",
issn = "0277-9536",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Self-reported hypertension prevalence and income among older adults in Canada and the United States

AU - Kaplan, Mark S.

AU - Huguet, Nathalie

AU - Feeny, David H.

AU - McFarland, Bentson

PY - 2010/3

Y1 - 2010/3

N2 - Hypertension is one of the most common chronic conditions worldwide. There is strong evidence that low socioeconomic status is associated with elevated rates of blood pressure-related cardiovascular disease. Few studies have examined the association between socioeconomic circumstances and hypertension among people aged 65 years and older. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between household income and self-reported hypertension prevalence among persons aged 65 and older in the United States and Canada. Data were obtained from the 2002-2003 Joint Canada/United States Survey of Health for 755 Canadian and 1151 US adults aged 65 and older. Aggregate hypertension prevalence rates in the United States and Canada were generally similar (53.8% versus 48.0%). We found a significant inverse linear relationship between household income and the hypertension prevalence rate in the United States, but no evidence of such a relationship in Canada. In Canada, unlike the United States, the burden of hypertension is approximately equal for socioeconomically advantaged and disadvantaged older adults. It is important to consider these findings in the context of long-term and broader institutional policies. Social disparities and barriers to health care access and primary prevention among non-elderly persons in the United States may play a role in the higher hypertension prevalence rate among low-income older adults.

AB - Hypertension is one of the most common chronic conditions worldwide. There is strong evidence that low socioeconomic status is associated with elevated rates of blood pressure-related cardiovascular disease. Few studies have examined the association between socioeconomic circumstances and hypertension among people aged 65 years and older. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between household income and self-reported hypertension prevalence among persons aged 65 and older in the United States and Canada. Data were obtained from the 2002-2003 Joint Canada/United States Survey of Health for 755 Canadian and 1151 US adults aged 65 and older. Aggregate hypertension prevalence rates in the United States and Canada were generally similar (53.8% versus 48.0%). We found a significant inverse linear relationship between household income and the hypertension prevalence rate in the United States, but no evidence of such a relationship in Canada. In Canada, unlike the United States, the burden of hypertension is approximately equal for socioeconomically advantaged and disadvantaged older adults. It is important to consider these findings in the context of long-term and broader institutional policies. Social disparities and barriers to health care access and primary prevention among non-elderly persons in the United States may play a role in the higher hypertension prevalence rate among low-income older adults.

KW - Aging

KW - Canada

KW - Health inequalities

KW - Hypertension

KW - Income

KW - Older people

KW - USA

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=77950358637&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=77950358637&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.socscimed.2009.11.019

DO - 10.1016/j.socscimed.2009.11.019

M3 - Article

C2 - 20079563

AN - SCOPUS:77950358637

VL - 70

SP - 844

EP - 849

JO - Social Science and Medicine

JF - Social Science and Medicine

SN - 0277-9536

IS - 6

ER -