Self-reported exposures and their association with unexplained illness in a population-based case-control study of Gulf War Veterans

Peter Spencer, Linda A. McCauley, Jodi Lapidus, Michael Lasarev, Sandra K. Joos, Daniel Storzbach

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

37 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Many factors have been considered as possible causes of the unexplained illness reported by veterans of the Gulf War (GW). In this study, we report an analysis of risk factors and unexplained illness in a population-based sample of GW veterans who underwent clinical evaluation. Multiple risk factors were compared in 241 veterans who met criteria for unexplained illness and 113 healthy controls. Results suggest that GW unexplained illness is most highly associated with combat conditions, heat stress, and having sought medical attention during the GW. When controlling for multiple simultaneous exposures during the GW, interactions around pyridostigmine bromide, insecticides and repellents, and stress were not significant. These results indicate that most unexplained illness in GW veterans cannot be explained by neurotoxic effects of exposures to chemicals that inhibit cholinesterase activity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1041-1056
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine
Volume43
Issue number12
StatePublished - 2001

Fingerprint

Gulf War
Veterans
Case-Control Studies
Population
Pyridostigmine Bromide
Cholinesterases
Insecticides
Hot Temperature

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

Cite this

Self-reported exposures and their association with unexplained illness in a population-based case-control study of Gulf War Veterans. / Spencer, Peter; McCauley, Linda A.; Lapidus, Jodi; Lasarev, Michael; Joos, Sandra K.; Storzbach, Daniel.

In: Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Vol. 43, No. 12, 2001, p. 1041-1056.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{242618a2ea024df399ae70b433de99bd,
title = "Self-reported exposures and their association with unexplained illness in a population-based case-control study of Gulf War Veterans",
abstract = "Many factors have been considered as possible causes of the unexplained illness reported by veterans of the Gulf War (GW). In this study, we report an analysis of risk factors and unexplained illness in a population-based sample of GW veterans who underwent clinical evaluation. Multiple risk factors were compared in 241 veterans who met criteria for unexplained illness and 113 healthy controls. Results suggest that GW unexplained illness is most highly associated with combat conditions, heat stress, and having sought medical attention during the GW. When controlling for multiple simultaneous exposures during the GW, interactions around pyridostigmine bromide, insecticides and repellents, and stress were not significant. These results indicate that most unexplained illness in GW veterans cannot be explained by neurotoxic effects of exposures to chemicals that inhibit cholinesterase activity.",
author = "Peter Spencer and McCauley, {Linda A.} and Jodi Lapidus and Michael Lasarev and Joos, {Sandra K.} and Daniel Storzbach",
year = "2001",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "43",
pages = "1041--1056",
journal = "Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine",
issn = "1076-2752",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "12",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Self-reported exposures and their association with unexplained illness in a population-based case-control study of Gulf War Veterans

AU - Spencer, Peter

AU - McCauley, Linda A.

AU - Lapidus, Jodi

AU - Lasarev, Michael

AU - Joos, Sandra K.

AU - Storzbach, Daniel

PY - 2001

Y1 - 2001

N2 - Many factors have been considered as possible causes of the unexplained illness reported by veterans of the Gulf War (GW). In this study, we report an analysis of risk factors and unexplained illness in a population-based sample of GW veterans who underwent clinical evaluation. Multiple risk factors were compared in 241 veterans who met criteria for unexplained illness and 113 healthy controls. Results suggest that GW unexplained illness is most highly associated with combat conditions, heat stress, and having sought medical attention during the GW. When controlling for multiple simultaneous exposures during the GW, interactions around pyridostigmine bromide, insecticides and repellents, and stress were not significant. These results indicate that most unexplained illness in GW veterans cannot be explained by neurotoxic effects of exposures to chemicals that inhibit cholinesterase activity.

AB - Many factors have been considered as possible causes of the unexplained illness reported by veterans of the Gulf War (GW). In this study, we report an analysis of risk factors and unexplained illness in a population-based sample of GW veterans who underwent clinical evaluation. Multiple risk factors were compared in 241 veterans who met criteria for unexplained illness and 113 healthy controls. Results suggest that GW unexplained illness is most highly associated with combat conditions, heat stress, and having sought medical attention during the GW. When controlling for multiple simultaneous exposures during the GW, interactions around pyridostigmine bromide, insecticides and repellents, and stress were not significant. These results indicate that most unexplained illness in GW veterans cannot be explained by neurotoxic effects of exposures to chemicals that inhibit cholinesterase activity.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0035211077&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0035211077&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 11765675

AN - SCOPUS:0035211077

VL - 43

SP - 1041

EP - 1056

JO - Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine

JF - Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine

SN - 1076-2752

IS - 12

ER -