Self-reported cognitive symptoms following mild traumatic brain injury are poorly associated with neuropsychological performance in OIF/OEF veterans

Robert J. Spencer, Lauren L. Drag, Sara Walker, Linas A. Bieliauskas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

67 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is not uncommon among Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation Enduring Freedom (OIF/OEF) veterans, and many individuals within this group report lingering cognitive difficulties following their injury. For Department of Veterans Affairs clinicians, an accurate assessment of cognitive symptoms is important in providing appropriate clinical care. Although self-assessment is commonly employed to screen for difficulties in cognitive functioning, little is known about the accuracy of self-report in this population. This study collected cognitive, psychiatric, and self-report data from 105 OIF/OEF veterans with mTBI to examine the relationship between self-reported cognitive functioning and objective neuropsychological test performance. Additionally, clinicians who frequently work with OIF/OEF veterans were asked to predict the magnitude of these associations. Self-reported cognitive functioning was not significantly correlated with objective cognitive abilities, suggesting that objective neuropsychological testing should be used when cognitive weakness is suspected. Perceived cognitive deficits were associated with depression, anxiety, and posttraumatic stress disorder, illustrating the additional importance of adequate assessment and treatment of psychiatric symptoms. Clinicians tended to overestimate the association between self-report and test performance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)521-530
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Rehabilitation Research and Development
Volume47
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 2010

Fingerprint

2003-2011 Iraq War
Afghan Campaign 2001-
Brain Concussion
Neurobehavioral Manifestations
Veterans
Self Report
Psychiatry
Aptitude
Neuropsychological Tests
Post-Traumatic Stress Disorders
Anxiety
Depression
Wounds and Injuries

Keywords

  • Anxiety
  • Brain injury
  • Cognition
  • Depression
  • Insight
  • Military
  • Neuropsychological assessment
  • Self-report
  • Traumatic psychometrics
  • Veterans

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rehabilitation

Cite this

Self-reported cognitive symptoms following mild traumatic brain injury are poorly associated with neuropsychological performance in OIF/OEF veterans. / Spencer, Robert J.; Drag, Lauren L.; Walker, Sara; Bieliauskas, Linas A.

In: Journal of Rehabilitation Research and Development, Vol. 47, No. 6, 2010, p. 521-530.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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