Self-rated health: Changes, trajectories, and their antecedents among African Americans

Fredric D. Wolinsky, Thomas R. Miller, Theodore K. Malmstrom, J. Philip Miller, Mario Schootman, Elena Andresen, Douglas K. Miller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Little is known about changes in self-rated health (SRH) among African Americans. Method: We examined SRH changes and trajectories among 998 African Americans 49 to 65 years old who we reinterviewed annually for 4 years, using multinomial logistic regression and mixed effect models. Results: Fifty-five percent had the same SRH at baseline and 4 years later, 25% improved, and 20% declined. Over time, men were more likely to report lower SRH levels, individuals with hypertension were less likely to report lower SRH levels, and those with congestive heart failure at baseline were more likely to report higher SRH levels. Lower SRH trajectory intercepts were observed for those with lower socioeconomic status, poorer health habits, disease history, and worse functional status. Those with better cognitive status had higher SRH trajectory intercepts. Discussion: The decline in SRH levels among 49- to 65-year-old African Americans is comparable to that of Whites.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)143-158
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Aging and Health
Volume20
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2008
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

African Americans
Health Status
Health
health
Self Report
Social Class
Habits
American
Heart Failure
Logistic Models
Hypertension
hypertension
habits
social status
logistics
Disease
regression
history

Keywords

  • African Americans
  • Longitudinal modeling
  • Self-rated health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Aging
  • Health(social science)
  • Health Professions(all)

Cite this

Wolinsky, F. D., Miller, T. R., Malmstrom, T. K., Miller, J. P., Schootman, M., Andresen, E., & Miller, D. K. (2008). Self-rated health: Changes, trajectories, and their antecedents among African Americans. Journal of Aging and Health, 20(2), 143-158. https://doi.org/10.1177/0898264307310449

Self-rated health : Changes, trajectories, and their antecedents among African Americans. / Wolinsky, Fredric D.; Miller, Thomas R.; Malmstrom, Theodore K.; Miller, J. Philip; Schootman, Mario; Andresen, Elena; Miller, Douglas K.

In: Journal of Aging and Health, Vol. 20, No. 2, 04.2008, p. 143-158.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wolinsky, FD, Miller, TR, Malmstrom, TK, Miller, JP, Schootman, M, Andresen, E & Miller, DK 2008, 'Self-rated health: Changes, trajectories, and their antecedents among African Americans', Journal of Aging and Health, vol. 20, no. 2, pp. 143-158. https://doi.org/10.1177/0898264307310449
Wolinsky, Fredric D. ; Miller, Thomas R. ; Malmstrom, Theodore K. ; Miller, J. Philip ; Schootman, Mario ; Andresen, Elena ; Miller, Douglas K. / Self-rated health : Changes, trajectories, and their antecedents among African Americans. In: Journal of Aging and Health. 2008 ; Vol. 20, No. 2. pp. 143-158.
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