Self-excitation of olfactory bulb neurones

R. A. Nicoll, Craig Jahr

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

92 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The concept that neurotransmitter released from a neurone may feed back and influence the excitability of the same neurone has been suggested by a variety of evidence. Anatomical studies have shown that axon collaterals can arborize among the dendrites of the parent neurone1-7, suggesting a direct feedback via axon collaterals. In addition, the dendritic release of dopamine from substantia nigra neurones has suggested that dopamine may exert a direct feedback inhibition of these neurones8,9. Little electrophysiological evidence is available, however, to indicate that such a mechanism does exist. Based on intracellular recordings, Park et al.10 have proposed a direct inhibitory feedback in the neostriatum, but a presynaptic mechanism was not entirely excluded. We have now found that blockade of synaptic inhibition of relay neurones in the olfactory bulb unmasks long-lasting depolarizing potentials which can trigger repetitive discharges. These depolarizing potentials result from direct feedback of dendritically released excitatory transmitter onto the same and neighbouring relay neurones. Such a process might contribute to epileptogenic neuronal discharge.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)441-444
Number of pages4
JournalNature
Volume296
Issue number5856
DOIs
StatePublished - 1982
Externally publishedYes

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Olfactory Bulb
Neurons
Axons
Dopamine
Neostriatum
Substantia Nigra
Dendrites
Neurotransmitter Agents

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Nicoll, R. A., & Jahr, C. (1982). Self-excitation of olfactory bulb neurones. Nature, 296(5856), 441-444. https://doi.org/10.1038/296441a0

Self-excitation of olfactory bulb neurones. / Nicoll, R. A.; Jahr, Craig.

In: Nature, Vol. 296, No. 5856, 1982, p. 441-444.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nicoll, RA & Jahr, C 1982, 'Self-excitation of olfactory bulb neurones', Nature, vol. 296, no. 5856, pp. 441-444. https://doi.org/10.1038/296441a0
Nicoll, R. A. ; Jahr, Craig. / Self-excitation of olfactory bulb neurones. In: Nature. 1982 ; Vol. 296, No. 5856. pp. 441-444.
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