Seeing Is Believing: Using Skype to Improve Diabetes Outcomes in Youth

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

34 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to compare the relative effectiveness of two modes of delivering Behavioral Family Systems Therapy for Diabetes (BFST-D) to improve adherence and glycemic control among adolescents with type 1 diabetes with suboptimal glycemic control (HbA(1c) ≥9.0% [≥74.9 mmol/mol]): face to face in clinic (Clinic) and Internet videoconferencing (Skype) conditions.

RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Adolescents aged 12 to 18 years and at least one adult caregiver were randomized to receive BFST-D via the Clinic or Skype condition. Participants completed up to 10 therapy sessions within a 12-week period. Changes in youth- and parent-reported adherence and glycemic control were compared before and after the intervention and at follow-up assessment.

RESULTS: Using an intent-to-treat analytic approach, no significant between-group differences were identified between the before, after, and follow-up assessments. Groups were collapsed to examine the overall effects of BFST-D on adherence and glycemic control. Results identified that statistically significant improvements in adherence and glycemic control occurred from before to after the intervention; improvements were maintained at 3-month follow-up.

CONCLUSIONS: Delivery of BFST-D via Internet-based videoconferencing is viable for addressing nonadherence and suboptimal glycemic control in adolescents with type 1 diabetes, potentially reducing important barriers to care for youth and families.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1427-1434
Number of pages8
JournalDiabetes Care
Volume38
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2015

Fingerprint

Family Therapy
Videoconferencing
Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus
Internet
Caregivers
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Seeing Is Believing : Using Skype to Improve Diabetes Outcomes in Youth. / Harris, Michael; Freeman, Kurt; Duke, Danny.

In: Diabetes Care, Vol. 38, No. 8, 01.08.2015, p. 1427-1434.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{7385557dd44f41aa8aa51e8bc9f28177,
title = "Seeing Is Believing: Using Skype to Improve Diabetes Outcomes in Youth",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to compare the relative effectiveness of two modes of delivering Behavioral Family Systems Therapy for Diabetes (BFST-D) to improve adherence and glycemic control among adolescents with type 1 diabetes with suboptimal glycemic control (HbA(1c) ≥9.0{\%} [≥74.9 mmol/mol]): face to face in clinic (Clinic) and Internet videoconferencing (Skype) conditions.RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Adolescents aged 12 to 18 years and at least one adult caregiver were randomized to receive BFST-D via the Clinic or Skype condition. Participants completed up to 10 therapy sessions within a 12-week period. Changes in youth- and parent-reported adherence and glycemic control were compared before and after the intervention and at follow-up assessment.RESULTS: Using an intent-to-treat analytic approach, no significant between-group differences were identified between the before, after, and follow-up assessments. Groups were collapsed to examine the overall effects of BFST-D on adherence and glycemic control. Results identified that statistically significant improvements in adherence and glycemic control occurred from before to after the intervention; improvements were maintained at 3-month follow-up.CONCLUSIONS: Delivery of BFST-D via Internet-based videoconferencing is viable for addressing nonadherence and suboptimal glycemic control in adolescents with type 1 diabetes, potentially reducing important barriers to care for youth and families.",
author = "Michael Harris and Kurt Freeman and Danny Duke",
year = "2015",
month = "8",
day = "1",
doi = "10.2337/dc14-2469",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "38",
pages = "1427--1434",
journal = "Diabetes Care",
issn = "1935-5548",
publisher = "American Diabetes Association Inc.",
number = "8",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Seeing Is Believing

T2 - Using Skype to Improve Diabetes Outcomes in Youth

AU - Harris, Michael

AU - Freeman, Kurt

AU - Duke, Danny

PY - 2015/8/1

Y1 - 2015/8/1

N2 - OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to compare the relative effectiveness of two modes of delivering Behavioral Family Systems Therapy for Diabetes (BFST-D) to improve adherence and glycemic control among adolescents with type 1 diabetes with suboptimal glycemic control (HbA(1c) ≥9.0% [≥74.9 mmol/mol]): face to face in clinic (Clinic) and Internet videoconferencing (Skype) conditions.RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Adolescents aged 12 to 18 years and at least one adult caregiver were randomized to receive BFST-D via the Clinic or Skype condition. Participants completed up to 10 therapy sessions within a 12-week period. Changes in youth- and parent-reported adherence and glycemic control were compared before and after the intervention and at follow-up assessment.RESULTS: Using an intent-to-treat analytic approach, no significant between-group differences were identified between the before, after, and follow-up assessments. Groups were collapsed to examine the overall effects of BFST-D on adherence and glycemic control. Results identified that statistically significant improvements in adherence and glycemic control occurred from before to after the intervention; improvements were maintained at 3-month follow-up.CONCLUSIONS: Delivery of BFST-D via Internet-based videoconferencing is viable for addressing nonadherence and suboptimal glycemic control in adolescents with type 1 diabetes, potentially reducing important barriers to care for youth and families.

AB - OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to compare the relative effectiveness of two modes of delivering Behavioral Family Systems Therapy for Diabetes (BFST-D) to improve adherence and glycemic control among adolescents with type 1 diabetes with suboptimal glycemic control (HbA(1c) ≥9.0% [≥74.9 mmol/mol]): face to face in clinic (Clinic) and Internet videoconferencing (Skype) conditions.RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Adolescents aged 12 to 18 years and at least one adult caregiver were randomized to receive BFST-D via the Clinic or Skype condition. Participants completed up to 10 therapy sessions within a 12-week period. Changes in youth- and parent-reported adherence and glycemic control were compared before and after the intervention and at follow-up assessment.RESULTS: Using an intent-to-treat analytic approach, no significant between-group differences were identified between the before, after, and follow-up assessments. Groups were collapsed to examine the overall effects of BFST-D on adherence and glycemic control. Results identified that statistically significant improvements in adherence and glycemic control occurred from before to after the intervention; improvements were maintained at 3-month follow-up.CONCLUSIONS: Delivery of BFST-D via Internet-based videoconferencing is viable for addressing nonadherence and suboptimal glycemic control in adolescents with type 1 diabetes, potentially reducing important barriers to care for youth and families.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84948674195&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84948674195&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.2337/dc14-2469

DO - 10.2337/dc14-2469

M3 - Article

C2 - 26033508

AN - SCOPUS:84948674195

VL - 38

SP - 1427

EP - 1434

JO - Diabetes Care

JF - Diabetes Care

SN - 1935-5548

IS - 8

ER -