Screening for High Blood Pressure in Children and Adolescents: US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement

Alex H. Krist, Karina W. Davidson, Carol M. Mangione, Michael J. Barry, Michael Cabana, Aaron B. Caughey, Katrina Donahue, Chyke A. Doubeni, John W. Epling, Martha Kubik, Gbenga Ogedegbe, Lori Pbert, Michael Silverstein, Melissa A. Simon, Chien Wen Tseng, John B. Wong

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Importance: Prevalence of hypertension (both primary and secondary) in children and adolescents in the US ranges from 3% to 4%. Primary hypertension in children and adolescents occurs primarily in children older than 13 years and has no known cause but is associated with several risk factors, including family history and higher body mass index. Secondary hypertension occurs primarily in younger children and is most commonly caused by genetic disorders, renal disease, endocrine disorders, or cardiovascular abnormalities. Objective: To update its 2013 recommendation, the USPSTF commissioned a review of the evidence on the benefits and harms of screening, test accuracy, the effectiveness and harms of treatment, and the association between hypertension and markers of cardiovascular disease in childhood and adulthood. Population: This recommendation statement applies to children and adolescents aged 3 to 18 years not known to have hypertension or who are asymptomatic. Evidence Assessment: The USPSTF concludes that the evidence to support screening for high blood pressure in children and adolescents is insufficient and that the balance of benefits and harms cannot be determined. Recommendation: The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of screening for high blood pressure in children and adolescents. (I statement).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1878-1883
Number of pages6
JournalJAMA - Journal of the American Medical Association
Volume324
Issue number18
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 10 2020

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Screening for High Blood Pressure in Children and Adolescents: US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this