Screening for gestational diabetes: Different cut-offs for different ethnicities?

Tania F. Esakoff, Yvonne W. Cheng, Aaron Caughey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

40 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To examine whether screening guidelines for gestational diabetes should be modified based on ethnicity. Study design: This is a retrospective cohort study of 14,565 pregnancies screened for gestational diabetes. The primary outcome of interest was the diagnosis of gestational diabetes based on the results of the 100-g glucose tolerance test. A diagnosis was determined if any 2 of the 4 values (fasting or 1-, 2-, or 3-hour postprandial) were at or above 95, 180, 155, or 140 mg/dL, respectively. Values of the 50-g glucose-loading test were examined from 130 mg/dL to 150 mg/dL. The sensitivity, specificity, false-positive rates, and positive predictive values of various glucose-loading test cut-offs were compared among whites, African Americans, Latinas, and Asians. The sensitivities and specificities were compared using receiver-operator characteristic curves. Results: Sensitivity and specificity of the glucose-loading test differ by ethnicity. Generally, African Americans achieved the highest sensitivities and specificities over the range examined. To achieve a false-positive rate of 10% for the glucose-loading test, the threshold value would be 133 mg/dL for African Americans, 140 mg/dL for whites, 143 mg/dL for Latinas, and 147 mg/dL for Asians. At the lower glucose-loading test values (130 and 135 mg/dL), Asians exhibited the highest positive predictive values (30.0% and 34.0%), whereas at higher values of the glucose-loading test (145 and 150 mg/dL), African Americans had the highest positive predictive values (46.0% and 51.5%). Throughout the glucose-loading test range, whites had the lowest positive predictive values (P <.001). Conclusions: To maximize the sensitivity and minimize the false-positive rate of the glucose-loading test, it may be reasonable to consider varying the threshold based on ethnicity. However, modification of glucose-loading test thresholds based on maternal ethnicity merit further study to determine whether improved perinatal outcomes can be achieved.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1040-1044
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume193
Issue number3 SUPPL.
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2005
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Gestational Diabetes
Glucose
African Americans
Sensitivity and Specificity
Hispanic Americans
Glucose Tolerance Test
Fasting
Cohort Studies
Retrospective Studies
Mothers
Guidelines
Pregnancy

Keywords

  • Ethnicity
  • Gestational diabetes
  • Glucose tolerance
  • Pregnancy
  • Screening test

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Screening for gestational diabetes : Different cut-offs for different ethnicities? / Esakoff, Tania F.; Cheng, Yvonne W.; Caughey, Aaron.

In: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Vol. 193, No. 3 SUPPL., 09.2005, p. 1040-1044.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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title = "Screening for gestational diabetes: Different cut-offs for different ethnicities?",
abstract = "Objective: To examine whether screening guidelines for gestational diabetes should be modified based on ethnicity. Study design: This is a retrospective cohort study of 14,565 pregnancies screened for gestational diabetes. The primary outcome of interest was the diagnosis of gestational diabetes based on the results of the 100-g glucose tolerance test. A diagnosis was determined if any 2 of the 4 values (fasting or 1-, 2-, or 3-hour postprandial) were at or above 95, 180, 155, or 140 mg/dL, respectively. Values of the 50-g glucose-loading test were examined from 130 mg/dL to 150 mg/dL. The sensitivity, specificity, false-positive rates, and positive predictive values of various glucose-loading test cut-offs were compared among whites, African Americans, Latinas, and Asians. The sensitivities and specificities were compared using receiver-operator characteristic curves. Results: Sensitivity and specificity of the glucose-loading test differ by ethnicity. Generally, African Americans achieved the highest sensitivities and specificities over the range examined. To achieve a false-positive rate of 10{\%} for the glucose-loading test, the threshold value would be 133 mg/dL for African Americans, 140 mg/dL for whites, 143 mg/dL for Latinas, and 147 mg/dL for Asians. At the lower glucose-loading test values (130 and 135 mg/dL), Asians exhibited the highest positive predictive values (30.0{\%} and 34.0{\%}), whereas at higher values of the glucose-loading test (145 and 150 mg/dL), African Americans had the highest positive predictive values (46.0{\%} and 51.5{\%}). Throughout the glucose-loading test range, whites had the lowest positive predictive values (P <.001). Conclusions: To maximize the sensitivity and minimize the false-positive rate of the glucose-loading test, it may be reasonable to consider varying the threshold based on ethnicity. However, modification of glucose-loading test thresholds based on maternal ethnicity merit further study to determine whether improved perinatal outcomes can be achieved.",
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N2 - Objective: To examine whether screening guidelines for gestational diabetes should be modified based on ethnicity. Study design: This is a retrospective cohort study of 14,565 pregnancies screened for gestational diabetes. The primary outcome of interest was the diagnosis of gestational diabetes based on the results of the 100-g glucose tolerance test. A diagnosis was determined if any 2 of the 4 values (fasting or 1-, 2-, or 3-hour postprandial) were at or above 95, 180, 155, or 140 mg/dL, respectively. Values of the 50-g glucose-loading test were examined from 130 mg/dL to 150 mg/dL. The sensitivity, specificity, false-positive rates, and positive predictive values of various glucose-loading test cut-offs were compared among whites, African Americans, Latinas, and Asians. The sensitivities and specificities were compared using receiver-operator characteristic curves. Results: Sensitivity and specificity of the glucose-loading test differ by ethnicity. Generally, African Americans achieved the highest sensitivities and specificities over the range examined. To achieve a false-positive rate of 10% for the glucose-loading test, the threshold value would be 133 mg/dL for African Americans, 140 mg/dL for whites, 143 mg/dL for Latinas, and 147 mg/dL for Asians. At the lower glucose-loading test values (130 and 135 mg/dL), Asians exhibited the highest positive predictive values (30.0% and 34.0%), whereas at higher values of the glucose-loading test (145 and 150 mg/dL), African Americans had the highest positive predictive values (46.0% and 51.5%). Throughout the glucose-loading test range, whites had the lowest positive predictive values (P <.001). Conclusions: To maximize the sensitivity and minimize the false-positive rate of the glucose-loading test, it may be reasonable to consider varying the threshold based on ethnicity. However, modification of glucose-loading test thresholds based on maternal ethnicity merit further study to determine whether improved perinatal outcomes can be achieved.

AB - Objective: To examine whether screening guidelines for gestational diabetes should be modified based on ethnicity. Study design: This is a retrospective cohort study of 14,565 pregnancies screened for gestational diabetes. The primary outcome of interest was the diagnosis of gestational diabetes based on the results of the 100-g glucose tolerance test. A diagnosis was determined if any 2 of the 4 values (fasting or 1-, 2-, or 3-hour postprandial) were at or above 95, 180, 155, or 140 mg/dL, respectively. Values of the 50-g glucose-loading test were examined from 130 mg/dL to 150 mg/dL. The sensitivity, specificity, false-positive rates, and positive predictive values of various glucose-loading test cut-offs were compared among whites, African Americans, Latinas, and Asians. The sensitivities and specificities were compared using receiver-operator characteristic curves. Results: Sensitivity and specificity of the glucose-loading test differ by ethnicity. Generally, African Americans achieved the highest sensitivities and specificities over the range examined. To achieve a false-positive rate of 10% for the glucose-loading test, the threshold value would be 133 mg/dL for African Americans, 140 mg/dL for whites, 143 mg/dL for Latinas, and 147 mg/dL for Asians. At the lower glucose-loading test values (130 and 135 mg/dL), Asians exhibited the highest positive predictive values (30.0% and 34.0%), whereas at higher values of the glucose-loading test (145 and 150 mg/dL), African Americans had the highest positive predictive values (46.0% and 51.5%). Throughout the glucose-loading test range, whites had the lowest positive predictive values (P <.001). Conclusions: To maximize the sensitivity and minimize the false-positive rate of the glucose-loading test, it may be reasonable to consider varying the threshold based on ethnicity. However, modification of glucose-loading test thresholds based on maternal ethnicity merit further study to determine whether improved perinatal outcomes can be achieved.

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KW - Glucose tolerance

KW - Pregnancy

KW - Screening test

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