Safety and efficacy of intravenous glyburide on brain swelling after large hemispheric infarction (GAMES-RP): a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase 2 trial

Kevin N. Sheth, Jordan J. Elm, Bradley J. Molyneaux, Holly Hinson, Lauren A. Beslow, Gordon K. Sze, Ann Christin Ostwaldt, Gregory J. del Zoppo, J. Marc Simard, Sven Jacobson, W. Taylor Kimberly

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Abstract

Background Preclinical models of stroke have shown that intravenous glyburide reduces brain swelling and improves survival. We assessed whether intravenous glyburide (RP-1127; glibenclamide) would safely reduce brain swelling, decrease the need for decompressive craniectomy, and improve clinical outcomes in patients presenting with a large hemispheric infarction. Methods For this double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled phase 2 trial, we enrolled patients (aged 18–80 years) with a clinical diagnosis of large anterior circulation hemispheric infarction for less than 10 h and baseline diffusion-weighted MRI image lesion volume of 82–300 cm3 on MRI at 18 hospitals in the USA. We used web-based randomisation (1:1) to allocate patients to the placebo or intravenous glyburide group. Intravenous glyburide was given as a 0·13 mg bolus intravenous injection for the first 2 min, followed by an infusion of 0·16 mg/h for the first 6 h and then 0·11 mg/h for the remaining 66 h. The primary efficacy outcome was the proportion of patients who achieved a modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score of 0–4 at 90 days without undergoing decompressive craniectomy. Analysis was by per protocol. Safety analysis included all randomly assigned patients who received the study drug. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01794182. Findings Between May 3, 2013, and April 30, 2015, 86 patients were randomly assigned but enrolment was stopped because of funding reasons. The funder, principal investigators, site investigators, patients, imaging core, and outcomes personnel were masked to treatment. The per-protocol study population was 41 participants who received intravenous glyburide and 36 participants who received placebo. 17 (41%) patients in the intravenous glyburide group and 14 (39%) in the placebo group had an mRS score of 0–4 at 90 days without decompressive craniectomy (adjusted odds ratio 0·87, 95% CI 0·32–2·32; p=0·77). Ten (23%) of 44 participants in the intravenous glyburide group and ten (26%) of 39 participants in the placebo group had cardiac events (p=0·76), and four of 20 had serious adverse events (two in the intravenous glyburide group and two in the placebo group, p=1·00). One cardiac death occurred in each group (p=1·00). Interpretation Intravenous glyburide was well tolerated in patients with large hemispheric stroke at risk for cerebral oedema. There was no difference in the composite primary outcome. Further study is warranted to assess the potential clinical benefit of a reduction in swelling by intravenous glyburide. Funding Remedy Pharmaceuticals.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1160-1169
Number of pages10
JournalThe Lancet Neurology
Volume15
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2016

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Glyburide
Brain Edema
Infarction
Placebos
Safety
Decompressive Craniectomy
Stroke
Research Personnel
Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Random Allocation
Double-Blind Method
Intravenous Injections
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Odds Ratio

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology

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Safety and efficacy of intravenous glyburide on brain swelling after large hemispheric infarction (GAMES-RP) : a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase 2 trial. / Sheth, Kevin N.; Elm, Jordan J.; Molyneaux, Bradley J.; Hinson, Holly; Beslow, Lauren A.; Sze, Gordon K.; Ostwaldt, Ann Christin; del Zoppo, Gregory J.; Simard, J. Marc; Jacobson, Sven; Kimberly, W. Taylor.

In: The Lancet Neurology, Vol. 15, No. 11, 01.10.2016, p. 1160-1169.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sheth, KN, Elm, JJ, Molyneaux, BJ, Hinson, H, Beslow, LA, Sze, GK, Ostwaldt, AC, del Zoppo, GJ, Simard, JM, Jacobson, S & Kimberly, WT 2016, 'Safety and efficacy of intravenous glyburide on brain swelling after large hemispheric infarction (GAMES-RP): a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase 2 trial', The Lancet Neurology, vol. 15, no. 11, pp. 1160-1169. https://doi.org/10.1016/S1474-4422(16)30196-X
Sheth, Kevin N. ; Elm, Jordan J. ; Molyneaux, Bradley J. ; Hinson, Holly ; Beslow, Lauren A. ; Sze, Gordon K. ; Ostwaldt, Ann Christin ; del Zoppo, Gregory J. ; Simard, J. Marc ; Jacobson, Sven ; Kimberly, W. Taylor. / Safety and efficacy of intravenous glyburide on brain swelling after large hemispheric infarction (GAMES-RP) : a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase 2 trial. In: The Lancet Neurology. 2016 ; Vol. 15, No. 11. pp. 1160-1169.
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abstract = "Background Preclinical models of stroke have shown that intravenous glyburide reduces brain swelling and improves survival. We assessed whether intravenous glyburide (RP-1127; glibenclamide) would safely reduce brain swelling, decrease the need for decompressive craniectomy, and improve clinical outcomes in patients presenting with a large hemispheric infarction. Methods For this double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled phase 2 trial, we enrolled patients (aged 18–80 years) with a clinical diagnosis of large anterior circulation hemispheric infarction for less than 10 h and baseline diffusion-weighted MRI image lesion volume of 82–300 cm3 on MRI at 18 hospitals in the USA. We used web-based randomisation (1:1) to allocate patients to the placebo or intravenous glyburide group. Intravenous glyburide was given as a 0·13 mg bolus intravenous injection for the first 2 min, followed by an infusion of 0·16 mg/h for the first 6 h and then 0·11 mg/h for the remaining 66 h. The primary efficacy outcome was the proportion of patients who achieved a modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score of 0–4 at 90 days without undergoing decompressive craniectomy. Analysis was by per protocol. Safety analysis included all randomly assigned patients who received the study drug. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01794182. Findings Between May 3, 2013, and April 30, 2015, 86 patients were randomly assigned but enrolment was stopped because of funding reasons. The funder, principal investigators, site investigators, patients, imaging core, and outcomes personnel were masked to treatment. The per-protocol study population was 41 participants who received intravenous glyburide and 36 participants who received placebo. 17 (41{\%}) patients in the intravenous glyburide group and 14 (39{\%}) in the placebo group had an mRS score of 0–4 at 90 days without decompressive craniectomy (adjusted odds ratio 0·87, 95{\%} CI 0·32–2·32; p=0·77). Ten (23{\%}) of 44 participants in the intravenous glyburide group and ten (26{\%}) of 39 participants in the placebo group had cardiac events (p=0·76), and four of 20 had serious adverse events (two in the intravenous glyburide group and two in the placebo group, p=1·00). One cardiac death occurred in each group (p=1·00). Interpretation Intravenous glyburide was well tolerated in patients with large hemispheric stroke at risk for cerebral oedema. There was no difference in the composite primary outcome. Further study is warranted to assess the potential clinical benefit of a reduction in swelling by intravenous glyburide. Funding Remedy Pharmaceuticals.",
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T1 - Safety and efficacy of intravenous glyburide on brain swelling after large hemispheric infarction (GAMES-RP)

T2 - a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase 2 trial

AU - Sheth, Kevin N.

AU - Elm, Jordan J.

AU - Molyneaux, Bradley J.

AU - Hinson, Holly

AU - Beslow, Lauren A.

AU - Sze, Gordon K.

AU - Ostwaldt, Ann Christin

AU - del Zoppo, Gregory J.

AU - Simard, J. Marc

AU - Jacobson, Sven

AU - Kimberly, W. Taylor

PY - 2016/10/1

Y1 - 2016/10/1

N2 - Background Preclinical models of stroke have shown that intravenous glyburide reduces brain swelling and improves survival. We assessed whether intravenous glyburide (RP-1127; glibenclamide) would safely reduce brain swelling, decrease the need for decompressive craniectomy, and improve clinical outcomes in patients presenting with a large hemispheric infarction. Methods For this double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled phase 2 trial, we enrolled patients (aged 18–80 years) with a clinical diagnosis of large anterior circulation hemispheric infarction for less than 10 h and baseline diffusion-weighted MRI image lesion volume of 82–300 cm3 on MRI at 18 hospitals in the USA. We used web-based randomisation (1:1) to allocate patients to the placebo or intravenous glyburide group. Intravenous glyburide was given as a 0·13 mg bolus intravenous injection for the first 2 min, followed by an infusion of 0·16 mg/h for the first 6 h and then 0·11 mg/h for the remaining 66 h. The primary efficacy outcome was the proportion of patients who achieved a modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score of 0–4 at 90 days without undergoing decompressive craniectomy. Analysis was by per protocol. Safety analysis included all randomly assigned patients who received the study drug. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01794182. Findings Between May 3, 2013, and April 30, 2015, 86 patients were randomly assigned but enrolment was stopped because of funding reasons. The funder, principal investigators, site investigators, patients, imaging core, and outcomes personnel were masked to treatment. The per-protocol study population was 41 participants who received intravenous glyburide and 36 participants who received placebo. 17 (41%) patients in the intravenous glyburide group and 14 (39%) in the placebo group had an mRS score of 0–4 at 90 days without decompressive craniectomy (adjusted odds ratio 0·87, 95% CI 0·32–2·32; p=0·77). Ten (23%) of 44 participants in the intravenous glyburide group and ten (26%) of 39 participants in the placebo group had cardiac events (p=0·76), and four of 20 had serious adverse events (two in the intravenous glyburide group and two in the placebo group, p=1·00). One cardiac death occurred in each group (p=1·00). Interpretation Intravenous glyburide was well tolerated in patients with large hemispheric stroke at risk for cerebral oedema. There was no difference in the composite primary outcome. Further study is warranted to assess the potential clinical benefit of a reduction in swelling by intravenous glyburide. Funding Remedy Pharmaceuticals.

AB - Background Preclinical models of stroke have shown that intravenous glyburide reduces brain swelling and improves survival. We assessed whether intravenous glyburide (RP-1127; glibenclamide) would safely reduce brain swelling, decrease the need for decompressive craniectomy, and improve clinical outcomes in patients presenting with a large hemispheric infarction. Methods For this double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled phase 2 trial, we enrolled patients (aged 18–80 years) with a clinical diagnosis of large anterior circulation hemispheric infarction for less than 10 h and baseline diffusion-weighted MRI image lesion volume of 82–300 cm3 on MRI at 18 hospitals in the USA. We used web-based randomisation (1:1) to allocate patients to the placebo or intravenous glyburide group. Intravenous glyburide was given as a 0·13 mg bolus intravenous injection for the first 2 min, followed by an infusion of 0·16 mg/h for the first 6 h and then 0·11 mg/h for the remaining 66 h. The primary efficacy outcome was the proportion of patients who achieved a modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score of 0–4 at 90 days without undergoing decompressive craniectomy. Analysis was by per protocol. Safety analysis included all randomly assigned patients who received the study drug. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01794182. Findings Between May 3, 2013, and April 30, 2015, 86 patients were randomly assigned but enrolment was stopped because of funding reasons. The funder, principal investigators, site investigators, patients, imaging core, and outcomes personnel were masked to treatment. The per-protocol study population was 41 participants who received intravenous glyburide and 36 participants who received placebo. 17 (41%) patients in the intravenous glyburide group and 14 (39%) in the placebo group had an mRS score of 0–4 at 90 days without decompressive craniectomy (adjusted odds ratio 0·87, 95% CI 0·32–2·32; p=0·77). Ten (23%) of 44 participants in the intravenous glyburide group and ten (26%) of 39 participants in the placebo group had cardiac events (p=0·76), and four of 20 had serious adverse events (two in the intravenous glyburide group and two in the placebo group, p=1·00). One cardiac death occurred in each group (p=1·00). Interpretation Intravenous glyburide was well tolerated in patients with large hemispheric stroke at risk for cerebral oedema. There was no difference in the composite primary outcome. Further study is warranted to assess the potential clinical benefit of a reduction in swelling by intravenous glyburide. Funding Remedy Pharmaceuticals.

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