Rushing, distraction, walking on contaminated floors and risk of slipping in limited-service restaurants

A case-crossover study

Santosh K. Verma, David A. Lombardi, Wen Ruey Chang, Theodore K. Courtney, Yueng-hsiang Huang, Melanye J. Brennan, Murray A. Mittleman, James H. Ware, Melissa J. Perry

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: This nested case-crossover study examined the association between rushing, distraction and walking on a contaminated floor and the rate of slipping, and whether the effects varied according to weekly hours worked, job tenure and use of slip-resistant shoes. Methods: At baseline, workers from 30 limited-service restaurants in the USA reported average work hours, average weekly duration of exposure to each transient risk factor and job tenure at the current location. Use of slip-resistant shoes was determined. During the following 12 weeks, participants reported weekly their slip experience and exposures to the three transient exposures at the time of slipping. The case-crossover design was used to estimate the rate ratios using the Mantel-Haenszel estimator for person-time data. Results: Among 396 participants providing baseline information, 210 reported one or more slips with a total of 989 slips. Rate of slipping was 2.9 times higher when rushing as compared to working at a normal pace (95% CI 2.5 to 3.3). Rate of slipping was also significantly increased by distraction (rate ratio (RR) 1.7, 95% CI 1.5 to 2.0) and walking on a contaminated floor (RR 14.6, 95% CI 12.6 to 17.0). Use of slip-resistant shoes decreased the effects of rushing and walking on a contaminated floor. Rate ratios for all three transient factors decreased monotonically as job tenure increased. Conclusion: The results suggest the importance of these transient risk factors, particularly floor contamination, on rate of slipping in limited-service restaurant workers. Stable characteristics, such as slip-resistant shoes, reduced the effects of transient exposures.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)575-581
Number of pages7
JournalOccupational and Environmental Medicine
Volume68
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2011
Externally publishedYes

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Restaurants
Shoes
Cross-Over Studies
Walking

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Rushing, distraction, walking on contaminated floors and risk of slipping in limited-service restaurants : A case-crossover study. / Verma, Santosh K.; Lombardi, David A.; Chang, Wen Ruey; Courtney, Theodore K.; Huang, Yueng-hsiang; Brennan, Melanye J.; Mittleman, Murray A.; Ware, James H.; Perry, Melissa J.

In: Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Vol. 68, No. 8, 01.08.2011, p. 575-581.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Verma, Santosh K. ; Lombardi, David A. ; Chang, Wen Ruey ; Courtney, Theodore K. ; Huang, Yueng-hsiang ; Brennan, Melanye J. ; Mittleman, Murray A. ; Ware, James H. ; Perry, Melissa J. / Rushing, distraction, walking on contaminated floors and risk of slipping in limited-service restaurants : A case-crossover study. In: Occupational and Environmental Medicine. 2011 ; Vol. 68, No. 8. pp. 575-581.
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