Rural clinician evaluation of children's health care quality measures

An Oregon Rural Practice-based Research Network (ORPRN) study

Lyle Fagnan, Leann Michaels, Katrina Ramsey, Stefan Shearer, Oliver Droppers, Charles Gallia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Responding to quality metrics is an accepted and expected component of the current health care environment. Little is known about which measures physicians identify as a priority when reporting the quality of care to their patients, especially the care of children in rural settings. The objective of this study is for physicians caring for children in rural communities to identify which of the initial core sets of 24 child health quality measures are useful and are a priority for reporting and improving care. Methods: A survey was sent to rural Oregon physicians who provide care to children. Results: Of 955 eligible physicians, 172 (18%) completed the survey. The majority of respondents were family physicians (84%), and most respondents (58%) were in private practice. The child health measures stratified into 3 priority tiers: high, medium, and low priority. The top-tier priority measures included childhood immunization status, well-child visits, adolescent immunization status, body mass index assessment, and developmental screening. Dental treatment services, adequate prenatal care, and lower-birth-weight infants were among the lower-tier measures. Conclusions: The priority measures identified by rural family physicians reflect the relevance of the selected measures to their daily practice responsibilities, with missed opportunities to improve community health.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)595-604
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of the American Board of Family Medicine
Volume28
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2015

Fingerprint

Child Care
Delivery of Health Care
Physicians
Family Physicians
Research
Immunization
Prenatal Care
Quality of Health Care
Private Practice
Rural Population
Birth Weight
Patient Care
Tooth
Body Mass Index
Child Health
Surveys and Questionnaires
Health
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Child Health
  • Practice-based Research Network
  • Primary Health Care
  • Quality Improvement
  • Rural Health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Family Practice

Cite this

Rural clinician evaluation of children's health care quality measures : An Oregon Rural Practice-based Research Network (ORPRN) study. / Fagnan, Lyle; Michaels, Leann; Ramsey, Katrina; Shearer, Stefan; Droppers, Oliver; Gallia, Charles.

In: Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine, Vol. 28, No. 5, 01.09.2015, p. 595-604.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fagnan, Lyle ; Michaels, Leann ; Ramsey, Katrina ; Shearer, Stefan ; Droppers, Oliver ; Gallia, Charles. / Rural clinician evaluation of children's health care quality measures : An Oregon Rural Practice-based Research Network (ORPRN) study. In: Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine. 2015 ; Vol. 28, No. 5. pp. 595-604.
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