Role of membrane potential in the response of human T lymphocytes to phytohemagglutinin

E. W. Gelfand, R. K. Cheung, Gordon Mills, S. Grinstein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

We have analyzed the role of membrane potential on T cell activation and cell proliferation. Depolarization of T lymphocytes, by increasing the extracellular concentration of K+ during a 1-hr exposure to PHA, results in a marked inhibition of cell proliferation. In parallel, depolarization of T cells prevented the normal increase in [Ca2+](i) seen after PHA binding. In depolarized cells, PHA failed to induce IL 2 secretion, but, in contrast, IL 2 receptor expression was triggered normally and the cells were subsequently responsive to exogenous IL 2. Increasing [Ca2+](i) in depolarized cells with the ionophore ionomycin, or bypassing the requirement for an increase in [Ca2+](i) with TPA, restored the PHA-induced proliferative response in depolarized cells. These data confirm that a membrane potential-sensitive step, namely, Ca2+ influx and the resulting change in [Ca2+](i), is triggered by PHA. The inhibitory effects of depolarization are mediated through the impairment of IL 2 secretion, but not IL 2 receptor expression. T cell proliferation can therefore be regulated by altering membrane potential, which in turn modulates the extent of the change in [Ca2+](i). This study suggests a role for transmembrane potential in the regulation of the T cell proliferative response.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)527-531
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Immunology
Volume138
Issue number2
StatePublished - Jan 1 1987
Externally publishedYes

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Phytohemagglutinins
Membrane Potentials
T-Lymphocytes
Interleukin-2
Interleukin-2 Receptors
Cell Proliferation
Ionomycin
Ionophores

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology

Cite this

Role of membrane potential in the response of human T lymphocytes to phytohemagglutinin. / Gelfand, E. W.; Cheung, R. K.; Mills, Gordon; Grinstein, S.

In: Journal of Immunology, Vol. 138, No. 2, 01.01.1987, p. 527-531.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gelfand, EW, Cheung, RK, Mills, G & Grinstein, S 1987, 'Role of membrane potential in the response of human T lymphocytes to phytohemagglutinin', Journal of Immunology, vol. 138, no. 2, pp. 527-531.
Gelfand, E. W. ; Cheung, R. K. ; Mills, Gordon ; Grinstein, S. / Role of membrane potential in the response of human T lymphocytes to phytohemagglutinin. In: Journal of Immunology. 1987 ; Vol. 138, No. 2. pp. 527-531.
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