Role of inferior turbinate reduction in the quality of life of patients undergoing endoscopic sinus surgery for chronic rhinosinusitis

Ethan Soudry, Jess Mace, Timothy Smith, Peter H. Hwang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: The impact on quality of life (QoL) of bilateral inferior turbinate reduction (BITR) performed in the setting of endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS) for chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) has been a point of controversy. The aim of this study was to determine whether addition of BITR to ESS is associated with improved QoL when compared with ESS alone. Methods: This study presented findings a multi-institutional, retrospective analysis of a prospective open cohort of patients electing ESS for failed medical management of CRS. QoL parameters were compared between patients who underwent ESS alone vs those who underwent ESS with BITR. Results: A total of 571 patients with CRS who elected to undergo ESS were identified. Sixty-one of these patients also underwent concurrent BITR, whereas 510 patients underwent ESS without BITR. Mean length of follow-up was 15.1 months. Comparison between baseline and last postoperative QoL, olfaction, and endoscopic scores revealed significant improvement in both groups. Overall, BITR surgery was not significantly associated with clinically significant incremental improvement in QoL in either the polyp or non-polyp group. Nevertheless, statistically significant improvement was noted for the nasal congestion/blockage symptom in polyp patients (p = 0.006) and in primary surgery patients (p = 0.027) who underwent BITR. Conclusion: BITR in the setting of ESS for CRS is not associated with significant incremental improvement in overall QoL vs ESS alone. However, BITR in polyp and primary surgery patients undergoing ESS appears to offer a significant incremental improvement in nasal congestion/blockage symptoms compared with ESS alone. Future studies are warranted to better corroborate these findings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalInternational Forum of Allergy and Rhinology
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

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Turbinates
Quality of Life
Polyps
Nasal Obstruction
Smell

Keywords

  • chronic rhinosinusitis
  • endoscopic sinus surgery
  • Inferior turbinate reduction
  • nasal congestion
  • quality of life

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Otorhinolaryngology

Cite this

@article{304ed995c9d34660886bcddba4832312,
title = "Role of inferior turbinate reduction in the quality of life of patients undergoing endoscopic sinus surgery for chronic rhinosinusitis",
abstract = "Background: The impact on quality of life (QoL) of bilateral inferior turbinate reduction (BITR) performed in the setting of endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS) for chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) has been a point of controversy. The aim of this study was to determine whether addition of BITR to ESS is associated with improved QoL when compared with ESS alone. Methods: This study presented findings a multi-institutional, retrospective analysis of a prospective open cohort of patients electing ESS for failed medical management of CRS. QoL parameters were compared between patients who underwent ESS alone vs those who underwent ESS with BITR. Results: A total of 571 patients with CRS who elected to undergo ESS were identified. Sixty-one of these patients also underwent concurrent BITR, whereas 510 patients underwent ESS without BITR. Mean length of follow-up was 15.1 months. Comparison between baseline and last postoperative QoL, olfaction, and endoscopic scores revealed significant improvement in both groups. Overall, BITR surgery was not significantly associated with clinically significant incremental improvement in QoL in either the polyp or non-polyp group. Nevertheless, statistically significant improvement was noted for the nasal congestion/blockage symptom in polyp patients (p = 0.006) and in primary surgery patients (p = 0.027) who underwent BITR. Conclusion: BITR in the setting of ESS for CRS is not associated with significant incremental improvement in overall QoL vs ESS alone. However, BITR in polyp and primary surgery patients undergoing ESS appears to offer a significant incremental improvement in nasal congestion/blockage symptoms compared with ESS alone. Future studies are warranted to better corroborate these findings.",
keywords = "chronic rhinosinusitis, endoscopic sinus surgery, Inferior turbinate reduction, nasal congestion, quality of life",
author = "Ethan Soudry and Jess Mace and Timothy Smith and Hwang, {Peter H.}",
year = "2019",
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doi = "10.1002/alr.22356",
language = "English (US)",
journal = "International Forum of Allergy and Rhinology",
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T1 - Role of inferior turbinate reduction in the quality of life of patients undergoing endoscopic sinus surgery for chronic rhinosinusitis

AU - Soudry, Ethan

AU - Mace, Jess

AU - Smith, Timothy

AU - Hwang, Peter H.

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - Background: The impact on quality of life (QoL) of bilateral inferior turbinate reduction (BITR) performed in the setting of endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS) for chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) has been a point of controversy. The aim of this study was to determine whether addition of BITR to ESS is associated with improved QoL when compared with ESS alone. Methods: This study presented findings a multi-institutional, retrospective analysis of a prospective open cohort of patients electing ESS for failed medical management of CRS. QoL parameters were compared between patients who underwent ESS alone vs those who underwent ESS with BITR. Results: A total of 571 patients with CRS who elected to undergo ESS were identified. Sixty-one of these patients also underwent concurrent BITR, whereas 510 patients underwent ESS without BITR. Mean length of follow-up was 15.1 months. Comparison between baseline and last postoperative QoL, olfaction, and endoscopic scores revealed significant improvement in both groups. Overall, BITR surgery was not significantly associated with clinically significant incremental improvement in QoL in either the polyp or non-polyp group. Nevertheless, statistically significant improvement was noted for the nasal congestion/blockage symptom in polyp patients (p = 0.006) and in primary surgery patients (p = 0.027) who underwent BITR. Conclusion: BITR in the setting of ESS for CRS is not associated with significant incremental improvement in overall QoL vs ESS alone. However, BITR in polyp and primary surgery patients undergoing ESS appears to offer a significant incremental improvement in nasal congestion/blockage symptoms compared with ESS alone. Future studies are warranted to better corroborate these findings.

AB - Background: The impact on quality of life (QoL) of bilateral inferior turbinate reduction (BITR) performed in the setting of endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS) for chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) has been a point of controversy. The aim of this study was to determine whether addition of BITR to ESS is associated with improved QoL when compared with ESS alone. Methods: This study presented findings a multi-institutional, retrospective analysis of a prospective open cohort of patients electing ESS for failed medical management of CRS. QoL parameters were compared between patients who underwent ESS alone vs those who underwent ESS with BITR. Results: A total of 571 patients with CRS who elected to undergo ESS were identified. Sixty-one of these patients also underwent concurrent BITR, whereas 510 patients underwent ESS without BITR. Mean length of follow-up was 15.1 months. Comparison between baseline and last postoperative QoL, olfaction, and endoscopic scores revealed significant improvement in both groups. Overall, BITR surgery was not significantly associated with clinically significant incremental improvement in QoL in either the polyp or non-polyp group. Nevertheless, statistically significant improvement was noted for the nasal congestion/blockage symptom in polyp patients (p = 0.006) and in primary surgery patients (p = 0.027) who underwent BITR. Conclusion: BITR in the setting of ESS for CRS is not associated with significant incremental improvement in overall QoL vs ESS alone. However, BITR in polyp and primary surgery patients undergoing ESS appears to offer a significant incremental improvement in nasal congestion/blockage symptoms compared with ESS alone. Future studies are warranted to better corroborate these findings.

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